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Period 4, 1800-1848

The new republic struggled to define and extend democratic ideals in the

face of rapid economic, territorial, and demographic changes.

 

 

Day:

39

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept 4.1, 4.3; GPS: SSUSH6b, c, & e

Our Topic:

The Virginia Dynasty, Jefferson to Adams

Defining federal power vis a vis the states

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and
change their society and institutions to match them.

4.3: The U.S. interest in increasing foreign trade and expanding its national borders shaped the nationís foreign policy and spurred government and private initiatives.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 227-234

Essential Question(s):

NAT-2.0: Explain how interpretations of the Constitution and debates over rights, liberties, and definitions of citizenship have affected American values, politics, and society.

POL-1.0: Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed
and changed.

Material to Master:

4.1

I. The nationís transition to a more participatory democracy was achieved by expanding suffrage from a system based on property ownership to one based on voting by all adult white men, and it was accompanied by the growth of
political parties.
A) In the early 1800s, national political parties continued to debate issues such as the tariff, powers of the federal
government, and relations with European powers. 
B) Supreme Court decisions established the primacy of the judiciary in determining the meaning of the Constitution and asserted
that federal laws took precedence over state laws.

D) Regional interests often trumped national concerns as the basis for many political leadersí positions on slavery and economic policy.

4.3

I. Struggling to create an independent global presence, the United States sought to claim territory throughout the North American continent and promote foreign trade.
A) Following the Louisiana Purchase, the United States government sought influence and control over North America and the Western Hemisphere through a variety of means, including exploration, military actions, American Indian removal,
and diplomatic efforts such as the Monroe Doctrine.

Documents to be utilized:

Thomas Mickell Burnham, The Lewis and Clark Expedition, ca. 1850. Museum Purchase 21.78, Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody, Wyoming. 

 

The American Political Tradition and The Men Who Made It by Richard Hofstadter

 

In Class:

Self-assessment: AP Insight Student Progress Sheet

 

the Virginia Dynasty

Map Lecture 1796-1819

 

Homework:

Video

 

&/or:

 

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines

- The War of 1812

-Cherokee Indian Culture

-Battle of Tippecanoe

-Monroe Doctrine (in class)

-Missouri Compromise (in class) 

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

40

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept 4.1, 4.3; GPS: SSUSH6b, c, & e

Our Topic:

The Virginia Dynasty, Jefferson to Adams

Defining federal power vis a vis the states

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and
change their society and institutions to match them.

4.3: The U.S. interest in increasing foreign trade and expanding its national borders shaped the nationís foreign policy and spurred government and private initiatives.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 227-234

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-2.0: Explain how interpretations of the Constitution and debates over rights, liberties, and definitions of citizenship have affected American values, politics, and society.

POL-1.0: Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed
and changed.

Material to Master:

4.1

I. The nationís transition to a more participatory democracy was achieved by expanding suffrage from a system based on property ownership to one based on voting by all adult white men, and it was accompanied by the growth of
political parties.
A) In the early 1800s, national political parties continued to debate issues such as the tariff, powers of the federal
government, and relations with European powers. 
B) Supreme Court decisions established the primacy of the judiciary in determining the meaning of the Constitution and asserted
that federal laws took precedence over state laws.

D) Regional interests often trumped national concerns as the basis for many political leadersí positions on slavery and economic policy.

4.3

I. Struggling to create an independent global presence, the United States sought to claim territory throughout the North American continent and promote foreign trade.
A) Following the Louisiana Purchase, the United States government sought influence and control over North America and the Western Hemisphere through a variety of means, including exploration, military actions, American Indian removal,
and diplomatic efforts such as the Monroe Doctrine.

II. The United Statesís acquisition of lands in the West gave rise to contests over
the extension of slavery into new territories.

C) Congressional attempts at political compromise, such as the Missouri Compromise, only temporarily stemmed growing tensions between opponents and defenders of slavery.

Documents to be utilized:

Thomas Mickell Burnham, The Lewis and Clark Expedition, ca. 1850. Museum Purchase 21.78, Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody, Wyoming. 

 

The American Political Tradition and The Men Who Made It by Richard Hofstadter

 

In Class:

 

 

the Virginia Dynasty

Map Lecture 1796-1819

 

Homework:

Boyer: 255-259 & Shweikart & Allen: 207-209

Optional

If Supreme Court decisions not clear from lecture:

Boyer: 231, 248-249

&/or:

Crash Course on Marbury v. Madison & Video on McCulloch vs. Maryland

Flashcards &/or outlines

-Marbury v. Madison

-McCulloch vs. Maryland

-Alexis de Tocqueville

-Andrew Jackson and the Indians

-Indian Removal Act

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

41

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.3

Our Topic:

Westward Expansion and the Indians

4.3: The U.S. interest in increasing foreign trade and expanding its national borders shaped the nationís foreign policy
and spurred government and private initiatives.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Shweikart & Allen: 207-209

Boyer: 255-259

 

Essential Question(s):

MIG-2.0: Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States,
and explain how migration has affected American life.

Material to Master:

I. Struggling to create an independent global presence, the United States sought to claim territory throughout the North American continent and promote foreign trade.
A) Following the Louisiana Purchase, the United States
government sought influence and control over North
America and the Western Hemisphere through a
variety of means, including exploration, military actions,
American Indian removal, and diplomatic efforts such
as the Monroe Doctrine.

Documents to be utilized:

A Patriot's History of the United States, from Columbus's Great Discovery to the War on Terror by Larry Scheikart and Michael Allen

In Class:

Go over unit one test.

Homework:

Zinn: 133-148 (Chapter 7 As Long as Grass Grows or Water Runs, you may skip first 8 pages)

 

&/or:

 

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines

-Seminole Wars

 

Turn in next class:

Socratic Seminar tomorrow

Guiding Questions:

-How did the interplay between state and federal government led to Indian removal?

-What role did Jackson play in Indian removal and what motivated this participation?

-How did state and federal government coerce the Indians to leave and what was their justifications for doing so?

-What types of resistance did the Indians offer?

-Why did Zinn choose "As Long as Grass Grows or Water Runs" as the title of this chapter?

-Should Andrew Jackson be on the twenty dollar bill?

 

 

Day:

42

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.1, 4.2, 4.3

Our Topic:

Westward Expansion and the Indians

4.3: The U.S. interest in increasing foreign trade and expanding its national borders shaped the nationís foreign policy
and spurred government and private initiatives.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Zinn: 133-148 (Chapter 7 As Long as Grass Grows or Water Runs, you may skip first 8 pages)

 

Essential Question(s):

MIG-2.0: Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States,
and explain how migration has affected American life.

Material to Master:

I. Struggling to create an independent global presence, the United States sought to claim territory throughout the North American continent and promote foreign trade.
A) Following the Louisiana Purchase, the United States
government sought influence and control over North
America and the Western Hemisphere through a
variety of means, including exploration, military actions,
American Indian removal, and diplomatic efforts such
as the Monroe Doctrine.

B) Frontier settlers tended to champion expansion efforts, while American Indian resistance led to a sequence of wars and federal efforts to control and relocate American Indian populations.

Documents to be utilized:

A People's History of the United States, by Howard Zinn

A Patriot's History of the United States, from Columbus's Great Discovery to the War on Terror by Larry Scheikart and Michael Allen

In Class:

Socratic Seminar

Guiding Questions:

-How did the interplay between state and federal government led to Indian removal?

-What role did Jackson play in Indian removal and what motivated this participation?

-How did state and federal government coerce the Indians to leave and what was their justifications for doing so?

-What types of resistance did the Indians offer?

-Why did Zinn choose "As Long as Grass Grows or Water Runs" as the title of this chapter?

-Should Andrew Jackson be on the twenty dollar bill?

Homework:

Boyer: 261-270, Video  

Optional:

Video

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Agricultural Boom of early 1800's

-Land Speculation & western expansion

-Transportation Revolution of nineteenth century

-Erie Canal

-Growth of New York City

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

43

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.2; GPS: SSUSH6d

Our Topic:

Industrialization and Transportation

4.2: Innovations in technology, agriculture, and commerce powerfully accelerated the American economy, precipitating profound changes to U.S. society and to national
and regional identities.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 261-270

 

Essential Question(s):

POL-3.0: Explain how different beliefs about the federal governmentís role in U.S. social and economic life have affected political debates and policies.
WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.
WXT-3.0: Analyze how technological innovation has affected economic development and society.

Material to Master:

I. New transportation systems and technologies dramatically expanded manufacturing and agricultural production.
B) Innovations including textile machinery, steam
engines, interchangeable parts, the telegraph, and agricultural inventions increased the efficiency of production methods.
C) Legislation and judicial
systems supported the development of roads,
canals, and railroads, which extended and enlarged markets and helped foster regional interdependence. Transportation networks
linked the North and Midwest more closely
than either was linked to the South.

III. Economic development shaped settlement and trade patterns, helping to unify the nation while also encouraging the growth of different regions.

B) Increasing Southern cotton production and the
related growth of Northern manufacturing, banking, and shipping industries promoted the development of national and international
commercial ties.

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

Simulation:

 

Student act as marketing agents for a railroad, canal company, or road company and create proposals for the creation of a new transportation link between Pittsburg and  Cleveland.  They support their proposal with successful example of their respective technology.

Homework:

Boyer: 269-277, 285-289

 

optional

video & video

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines

-Urbanization in the early 19th century

-Lowell system

-Samuel Slater

-Irish Immigration (more added later)

-African Methodist Episcopal

-Middling Classes

-Political Democratization

-Andrew Jackson (more to come)

-Democrats Party of 19th century (more to come)

-Whig Party (more to come)

-Henry Clay's American System

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

X44X

Dates:

 

Topic #:

 

Our Topic:

skip

Required

Pre-Reading:

 

 

Essential Question(s):

 

Material to Master:

 

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

skip

Homework:

 

 

&

 

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines

 

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

45

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concepts: 4.1, 4.2; SSUSH7e

Our Topic:

Political Democratization & Jackson

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and change their society and institutions to match them.

4.2 Innovations in technology, agriculture, and commerce powerfully accelerated the American economy, precipitating profound changes to U.S. society and to national and regional identities.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 279-289

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-2.0: Explain how interpretations of the Constitution and debates over rights, liberties, and definitions of citizenship have affected American values, politics, and society.

POL-1.0: Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed and changed.
WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.

Material to Master:

4.1

I. The nationís transition to a more participatory democracy was achieved by expanding suffrage from a system based on property ownership to one based
on voting by all adult white men, and it was accompanied by the growth of political parties.

C) By the 1820s and 1830s, new political parties arose ó the Democrats, led, by Andrew Jackson, and the Whigs,
led by Henry Clay ó that disagreed about the role
and powers of the federal government and issues
such as the national bank, tariffs, and federally funded
internal improvements.

4.3

III. Economic development shaped settlement and trade patterns, helping to unify the nation while also encouraging the growth of different regions.

D) Plans to further unify the U.S. economy, such as the
American System, generated debates over whether such
policies would benefit agriculture or industry, potentially favoring different sections of the country
.

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

Political Democratization Lecture

Andrew Jackson to John Tyler

Homework:

Boyer 289-299

 

Optional:

Video & Video

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Democratic Party of 19th century (cont.)

-Whig Party (cont.)

-Andrew Jackson (cont.)

-Nullification Crisis

-Nat Turner

-John C. Calhoun (more added later)

-Jackson and the Bank of the United States

Turn in next class:

Prepare for your role in tomorrow's simulation

Complete a position statements to explain your support for one of the candidates  be sure it contains at least three pieces of specific evidence to support your argument with specific reference to several of the topics identified on the link above.  Be prepare to challenge/defend your position with at least two more pieces of specific evidence

 

 

Day:

46

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.1, 4.2, & 4.3; SSUSH7e & SSUSH8c

Our Topic:

Jackson and Van Buren

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and change their society and institutions to match them.

4.2 Innovations in technology, agriculture, and commerce powerfully accelerated the American economy, precipitating profound changes to U.S. society and to national and regional identities.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer 289-299

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-2.0: Explain how interpretations of the Constitution and debates over rights, liberties, and definitions of citizenship have affected American values, politics, and society.

POL-1.0: Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed and changed.
WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.

Material to Master:

4.1

I. The nationís transition to a more participatory democracy was achieved by expanding suffrage from a system based on property ownership to one based
on voting by all adult white men, and it was accompanied by the growth of political parties.

C) By the 1820s and 1830s, new political parties arose ó the Democrats, led, by Andrew Jackson, and the Whigs,
led by Henry Clay ó that disagreed about the role
and powers of the federal government and issues
such as the national bank, tariffs, and federally funded
internal improvements.

D) Regional interests often trumped national concerns
as the basis for many political leadersí positions on
slavery and economic policy.

III. Increasing numbers of Americans, many inspired by new religious and intellectual movements, worked primarily outside of government institutions
to advance their ideals.
A) Americans formed new voluntary organizations that
aimed to change individual behaviors and improve
society through temperance and other reform efforts.

4.3

III. Economic development shaped settlement and trade patterns, helping to unify the nation while also encouraging the growth of different regions.

D) Plans to further unify the U.S. economy, such as the
American System, generated debates over whether such
policies would benefit agriculture or industry, potentially favoring different sections of the country
.

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

Simulation of the presidential election of 1840

 

Homework:

Boyer: 299-303

 

&

Introduction to the Book of Mormon

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Second Great Awakening

-Charles G. Finney & Evangelical Protestantism

-Mormons (more added later)

-Shakers

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

47

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.1

Our Topic:

Second Great Awakening

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and change their society and institutions to match them.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 299-303

 

Essential Question(s):

CUL-1.0: Explain how religious groups and ideas have affected American society and political life.

Material to Master:

II. While Americans embraced a new national culture, various groups developed distinctive cultures of their own.
A) The rise of democratic and individualistic beliefs, a response to rationalism, and changes to society caused by the market revolution,
along with greater social and geographical mobility, contributed to a Second Great Awakening among Protestants that influenced
moral and social reforms and inspired utopian and other religious movements.

C) Liberal social ideas from abroad and Romantic beliefs in human perfectibility influenced literature, art, philosophy, and architecture.
D) Enslaved blacks and free African Americans created communities and strategies to protect their dignity and family structures, and they
joined political efforts aimed at changing their status.

III. Increasing numbers of Americans, many inspired by new religious and intellectual movements, worked primarily outside of government institutions to advance their ideals.
A) Americans formed new voluntary organizations that aimed to change individual behaviors and improve society through temperance and other reform efforts.

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

Lecture on second great awakening

 

Video on the Mormons

with questions

Homework:

Boyer: 304-305, 313-314

 

&/or:

 

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Oneida Community

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

48

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.1

Our Topic:

Second Great Awakening

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and change their society and institutions to match them.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 304-305, 313-314

 

Essential Question(s):

CUL-1.0: Explain how religious groups and ideas have affected American society and political life.

Material to Master:

II. While Americans embraced a new national culture, various groups developed distinctive cultures of their own.
A) The rise of democratic and individualistic beliefs, a response to rationalism, and changes to society caused by the market revolution,
along with greater social and geographical mobility, contributed to a Second Great Awakening among Protestants that influenced
moral and social reforms and inspired utopian and other religious movements.

C) Liberal social ideas from abroad and Romantic beliefs in human perfectibility influenced literature, art, philosophy, and architecture.
D) Enslaved blacks and free African Americans created communities and strategies to protect their dignity and family structures, and they
joined political efforts aimed at changing their status.

III. Increasing numbers of Americans, many inspired by new religious and intellectual movements, worked primarily outside of government institutions to advance their ideals.
A) Americans formed new voluntary organizations that aimed to change individual behaviors and improve society through temperance and other reform efforts.

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

Second Great Awakening

 

Jigsaw: students answer questions about 4 of the major groups of the Second Great Awakening then use the information to complete a Venn Diagram

 

Video to summarize Second Great Awakening

Homework:

Boyer: 303, 306-310  

Optional:

Video; Mormon Exodus

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Temperance

-Horace Mann

-The American Colonization Society

-William Lloyd Garrison (more added later)

-Frederick Douglass (more added later)

-Angelina Grimke' & Sarah Grimke'

-gag rule

Turn in next class:

Prepare for a DBQ
 

Day:

49

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.1; SSUSH7c & d

Our Topic:

Reform Movements

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and change their society and institutions to match them.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 303, 306-310, skip "women's rights" 311-313

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.
POL-2.0: Explain how popular movements, reform efforts, and activist groups have sought to change American society and institutions.
CUL-3.0: Explain how ideas about womenís rights and gender roles have affected society and politics.

Material to Master:

III. Increasing numbers of Americans, many inspired by new religious and intellectual movements, worked primarily outside of government institutions
to advance their ideals.
A) Americans formed new voluntary organizations that
aimed to change individual behaviors and improve
society through temperance and other reform efforts.
B) Abolitionist and antislavery movements gradually
achieved emancipation in the North, contributing
to the growth of the free African American
population, even as many state governments
restricted African Americansí rights. Antislavery efforts in the South were largely limited to unsuccessful
slave rebellions.
C) A womenís rights movement sought to create greater equality and opportunities for women,
expressing its ideals at the Seneca Falls Convention.

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

Independent DBQ, Topic: Reform

 

DBQ Rubric & Structure

Homework:

Zinn: 103-124

 

&/or:

 

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-home as a refuge

-separate spheres

-cult of domesticity

-Elizabeth Cady Stanton

-Seneca Falls

Turn in next class:

Prepare of Socratic Seminar, guiding questions:

-How was the doctrine of separate sphere / a womenís place / the cult of true womanhood used as tools of oppression?

-How did the industrial revolution transform the link between class and gender roles?

-How did nascent labor movements facilitated working class womenís self advocacy?

-How was fashion used as a tool of oppression and how did women overcome this?  How did men respond?

-How did the abolition movement become a catalyst for the early feminism?

-How did the concept of separate spheres facilitate middle and upper class womenís movement into reform movements and thereby give them a voice to advocate for their own rights?

 

Day:

50

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.1, 4.2; GPS: SSUSH7d

Our Topic:

Women

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and change their society and institutions to match them.

4.2 Innovations in technology, agriculture, and commerce powerfully accelerated the American economy, precipitating profound changes to U.S. society and to national and regional identities.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Zinn: 103-124

 

Essential Question(s):

CUL-3.0: Explain how ideas about womenís rights and gender roles have affected society and politics.

Material to Master:

4.1

III. Increasing numbers of Americans, many inspired by new religious and intellectual movements, worked primarily outside of government institutions
to advance their ideals.
A) Americans formed new voluntary organizations that
aimed to change individual behaviors and improve
society through temperance and other reform efforts.
B) Abolitionist and antislavery movements gradually
achieved emancipation in the North, contributing
to the growth of the free African American
population, even as many state governments
restricted African Americansí rights. Antislavery efforts in the South were largely limited to unsuccessful
slave rebellions.
C) A womenís rights movement sought to create greater equality and opportunities for women,
expressing its ideals at the Seneca Falls Convention.

4.2

II. The changes caused by the market revolution had significant effects on U.S. society, workersí lives, and gender and family relations.
A) Increasing numbers of Americans, especially
women and men working in factories, no longer relied on
semisubsistence agriculture; instead they supported
themselves producing goods for distant markets.

C) Gender and family roles changed in response to
the market revolution, particularly with the growth
of definitions of domestic ideals that emphasized
the separation of public and private spheres.

Documents to be utilized:

A People's History of the United States, by Howard Zinn, chapter 6

In Class:

-How was the doctrine of separate sphere / a womenís place / the cult of true womanhood used as tools of oppression?

-How did the industrial revolution transform the link between class and gender roles?

-How did nascent labor movements facilitated working class womenís self advocacy?

-How was fashion used as a tool of oppression and how did women overcome this?  How did men respond?

-How did the abolition movement become a catalyst for the early feminism?

-How did the concept of separate spheres facilitate middle and upper class womenís movement into reform movements and thereby give them a voice to advocate for their own rights?

Homework:

Boyer: 317-326

 

&

AP Insight: Challenge Area VI Building Block A Homework

optional

video

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-John Deere

-McCormick Reaper

-Telegraph

-Rail Road Boom

-Singer Sewing Machines

-Eli Whitney & Interchangeable Parts

Turn in next class:

Challenge Area VI Building Block A Homework
 

Day:

51

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept 4.2, SSUSH7a

Our Topic:

Industrialization

4.2 Innovations in technology, agriculture, and commerce powerfully accelerated the American economy, precipitating profound changes to U.S. society and to national and regional identities.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 317-326

 

Essential Question(s):

WXT-3.0: Analyze how technological innovation has affected economic development and society.

POL-3.0: Explain how different beliefs about the federal governmentís role in U.S. social and economic life have affected political debates and policies.

Material to Master:

I. New transportation systems and technologies dramatically expanded manufacturing and agricultural production.
A) Entrepreneurs helped to create a market revolution in production and commerce,
in which market relationships between producers and consumers came to prevail
as the manufacture of goods became more organized.
B) Innovations including textile machinery, steam engines, interchangeable parts, the telegraph, and agricultural inventions
increased the efficiency of production methods.
D) Plans to further unify the U.S. economy, such as the American System, generated debates over whether such policies would benefit
agriculture or industry, potentially favoring different sections of the country.

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

Pre-assessment: AP Insight Student Progress Sheet

 

AP Insight: Challenge Area VI, Building Block A

Performance Task Ė Thesis & Claims: CCOT & Early Industrialization

Homework:

Boyer: 326-328, 331-332 & Russell/Hughes

 

&

 

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-mid 18th century stand of living by class

-minstrel shows

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

52

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.1 & 4.2

Our Topic:

Society and Class

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and change their society and institutions to match them.

4.2: Innovations in technology, agriculture, and
commerce powerfully accelerated the American economy, precipitating profound changes to U.S. society and to national and regional identities.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 326-328, 331-332 & Russell/Hughes

 

Essential Question(s):

CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and
changed over time.

NAT-4.0: Analyze relationships among different regional, social, ethnic, and racial groups, and explain how these groupsí experiences have related to U.S. national identity.

Material to Master:

4.1

II. While Americans embraced a new national culture, various groups developed distinctive cultures of their own.

B) A new national culture emerged that combined
American elements, European influences, and
regional cultural sensibilities.

4.2

II. The changes caused by the market revolution had significant effects on U.S. society, workersí lives, and gender and family relations.

B) The growth of manufacturing drove a significant increase in prosperity and standards of living for some; this led to the emergence of a larger middle class and a small but wealthy business elite but also to a large and growing
population of laboring poor.

Documents to be utilized:

A Renegade History of the United States by Thaddeus Russell

In Class:

AP Insight: Challenge Area VI, Building Block A Quiz

 

Minstrel Shows

 

After a reading an exerts from A Renegade History or the United States by Thaddeus Russell students write a op ed piece on Minstrel Shows

 

Homework:

Boyer: 334-343

 

&/or:

 

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Henry David Thoreau

-women's fiction

-The Hudson School

-Frederick Law Olmstead

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

53

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.1

Our Topic:

Art and Literature

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and change their society and institutions to match them.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 334-343

 

Essential Question(s):

CUL-2.0: Explain how artistic, philosophical, and scientific ideas have developed and shaped society and institutions.

Material to Master:

II. While Americans embraced a new national culture, various groups developed distinctive cultures of their own.

B) A new national culture emerged that combined
American elements, European influences, and regional cultural sensibilities.
C) Liberal social ideas from abroad and Romantic beliefs
in human perfectibility influenced literature, art,
philosophy, and architecture.

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

The Hudson School of Art

 

Slide show with example of Hudson School Art

Homework:

Thoreau: 9-20  

&/or:

 

&

 

Flashcards:

 

Turn in next class:

Socratic Seminar, guiding questions:

-How was Walden typical of the Transcendental Movement?

-What does Thoreau mean by a "life of quiet desperation?

-In what ways did Walden help define the American identity?

-Was Thoreau happy with the state of American culture?

-How does Thoreau's work compare with Hawthorne, Melville and Poe?

(please consider works by these authors that you have read in other classes)

-Taken together, how can we use these author's to define American culture both then and now?

 

Day:

54

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.1

Our Topic:

Art and Literature

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and change their society and institutions to match them.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Thoreau: 9-20

 

Essential Question(s):

CUL-2.0: Explain how artistic, philosophical, and scientific ideas have developed and shaped society and institutions.

Material to Master:

II. While Americans embraced a new national culture, various groups developed distinctive cultures of their own.

B) A new national culture emerged that combined
American elements, European influences, and regional cultural sensibilities.
C) Liberal social ideas from abroad and Romantic beliefs
in human perfectibility influenced literature, art,
philosophy, and architecture.

Documents to be utilized:

Walden or, Life in the Woods by Henry David Thoreau

In Class:

Socratic Seminar, guiding questions:

-How was Walden typical of the Transcendental Movement?

-What does Thoreau mean by a "life of quiet desperation?

-In what ways did Walden help define the American identity?

-Was Thoreau happy with the state of American culture?

-How does Thoreau's work compare with Hawthorne, Melville and Poe?

-Taken together, how can we use these author's to define American culture both then and now?

 

Homework:

Boyer: 345-351  

&/or:

 

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Nat Turner

-The Old South

-peculiar institution

-Agriculture in the Antebellum South

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

55

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.1, 4.2, 4.3 SSUSH8a

Our Topic:

Politics Harrison to Taylor

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern
democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and change their society and institutions to match them.

4.2: Innovations in technology, agriculture, and
commerce powerfully accelerated the American economy, precipitating profound changes to U.S. society and to national and regional identities.

4.3: The U.S. interest in increasing foreign trade and
expanding its national borders shaped the nationís foreign policy and spurred government and private initiatives.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 345-351

 

Essential Question(s):

POL-1.0: Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed
and changed.

NAT-4.0: Analyze relationships among different regional, social, ethnic, and racial groups, and explain how these groupsí experiences have related to U.S. national identity.

MIG-1.0: Explain the causes of migration to colonial North America and, later, the United States, and analyze immigrationís effects on U.S. society.
MIG-2.0: Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States, and explain how migration has affected American life.

GEO-1.0: Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and
the development of government policies.

Material to Master:

4.1

I. The nationís transition to a more participatory democracy was achieved by expanding suffrage from a system based on property ownership to one based
on voting by all adult white men, and it was accompanied by the growth of political parties.

C) By the 1820s and 1830s, new political parties arose ó the Democrats, led, by Andrew Jackson, and the Whigs,
led by Henry Clay ó that disagreed about the role
and powers of the federal government and issues
such as the national bank, tariffs, and federally funded
internal improvements.

D) Regional interests often trumped national concerns
as the basis for many political leadersí positions on
slavery and economic policy.

III. Increasing numbers of Americans, many inspired by new religious and intellectual movements, worked primarily outside of government institutions to advance their ideals.

B) Abolitionist and antislavery movements gradually
achieved emancipation in the North, contributing
to the growth of the free African American
population, even as many state governments
restricted African Americansí rights. Antislavery efforts in
the South were largely limited to unsuccessful slave rebellions.

4.2

III. Economic development shaped settlement and trade patterns, helping to unify the nation while also encouraging the growth of different regions.
A) Large numbers of international migrants
moved to industrializing northern cities, while
many Americans moved west of the Appalachians,
developing thriving new communities along the Ohio
and Mississippi rivers.
B) Increasing Southern cotton production and the
related growth of Northern manufacturing, banking,
and shipping industries promoted the development
of national and international commercial ties.
C) Southern business leaders continued to rely on the
production and export of traditional agricultural
staples, contributing to the growth of a distinctive
Southern regional identity.

4.3

I. Struggling to create an independent global presence, the United States sought to claim territory throughout the North American continent and promote foreign trade.
A) Following the Louisiana Purchase, the United States
government sought influence and control over North
America and the Western Hemisphere through a
variety of means, including exploration, military actions,
American Indian removal, and diplomatic efforts such
as the Monroe Doctrine.

II. The United Statesís acquisition of lands in the West gave rise to contests over
the extension of slavery into new territories.
A) As overcultivation depleted arable land in the Southeast, slaveholders began relocating their plantations
to more fertile lands west of the Appalachians, where
the institution of slavery continued to grow.
C) Congressional attempts at political compromise, such
as the Missouri Compromise, only temporarily stemmed
growing tensions between opponents and
defenders of slavery.

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

Map lecture on 1824 - 1849

 

Homework:

Boyer: 351-354, 356-358

 

&/or:

 

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Planters

-southern support for slavery

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

56

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.3 SSUSH8a

Our Topic:

The Antebellum South

4.3: The U.S. interest in increasing foreign trade
and expanding its national borders shaped the nationís foreign policy and spurred government and private initiatives.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 351-358

 

Essential Question(s):

CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and
changed over time.

Material to Master:

II. The United Statesís acquisition of lands in the West gave rise to contests over the extension of slavery into new territories.

A) As overcultivation depleted arable land in the Southeast, slaveholders began relocating their plantations to more fertile lands west of the Appalachians, where the institution of slavery
continued to grow.

B) Antislavery efforts increased in the North, while in the South, although the majority of Southerners owned no slaves, most leaders argued that slavery was part of
the Southern way of life.

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

Pre-assessment: AP Insight Student Progress Sheet

 

AP Insight: Challenge Area III, Building Block B

Performance Task Ė Extended Analysis: Slavery and Sectionalism

 

 

Homework:

   

&

 

Optional:

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

 

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

56.5

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.1, 4.2, SSUSH8a

Our Topic:

The Antebellum South

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern
democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and change their society and institutions to match them.

4.2: Innovations in technology, agriculture, and
commerce powerfully accelerated the American economy, precipitating profound changes to U.S. society and to national and regional identities.

4.3: The U.S. interest in increasing foreign trade
and expanding its national borders shaped the nationís foreign policy and spurred government and private initiatives.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 351-358

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-4.0: Analyze relationships among different regional, social, ethnic, and racial groups, and explain how these groupsí experiences have related to U.S. national identity.

CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and
changed over time.

GEO-1.0: Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and the development of government policies.

Material to Master:

4.1

I. The nationís transition to a more participatory democracy was achieved by expanding suffrage from a system based on property ownership to one based
on voting by all adult white men, and it was accompanied by the growth of political parties.

D) Regional interests often trumped national concerns
as the basis for many political leadersí positions on
slavery and economic policy.

4.2

I. New transportation systems and technologies dramatically expanded manufacturing and agricultural production.

C) Legislation and judicial systems supported the
development of roads, canals, and railroads, which
extended and enlarged markets and helped foster
regional interdependence. Transportation networks
linked the North and Midwest more closely than either was linked to the South.

III. Economic development shaped settlement and trade patterns, helping to unify the nation while also encouraging the growth of different regions.

B) Increasing Southern cotton production and the
related growth of Northern manufacturing, banking,
and shipping industries promoted the development
of national and international commercial ties.
C) Southern business leaders continued to rely on the
production and export of traditional agricultural
staples, contributing to the growth of a distinctive
Southern regional identity.
D) Plans to further unify the U.S. economy, such as the
American System, generated debates over whether such policies would benefit agriculture or industry,
potentially favoring different sections of the country.

4.3

II. The United Statesís acquisition of lands in the West gave rise to contests over the extension of slavery into new territories.

B) Antislavery efforts increased in the North, while in the South, although the majority of Southerners owned no slaves, most leaders argued that slavery was part of
the Southern way of life.

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

(file # 56)

AP Insight: Challenge Area III, Building Block B  Quiz

 

Discuss Results

Complete Next Steps

and/or

Whites in the South & King Cotton, DBQ practice

Homework:

Boyer: 362-367  

&

Zinn: 171-180

Optional:

Video

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-slave resistance

-life of a slave

-plantation system

Turn in next class:

Bring Zinn to class
 

Day:

57

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.1; 4.3

Our Topic:

the lives of African American in slavery

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and
change their society and institutions to match them.

4.3: The U.S. interest in increasing foreign trade
and expanding its national borders shaped the nationís foreign
policy and spurred government and private initiatives.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 362-367

Zinn: 171-180

 

Essential Question(s):

WXT-1.0: Explain how different labor systems developed in North America and the United States, and explain their effects
on workersí lives and U.S. society.

Material to Master:

4.1

II. While Americans embraced a new national culture, various groups developed distinctive cultures of their own.

D) Enslaved blacks and free African Americans created
communities and strategies to protect their dignity and
family structures, and they joined political efforts aimed
at changing their status.

4.3

II. The United Statesís acquisition of lands in the West gave rise to contests over the extension of slavery into new territories.

B) Antislavery efforts increased in the North, while in the
South, although the majority of Southerners owned no
slaves, most leaders argued that slavery was part of
the Southern way of life.

Documents to be utilized:

A People's History of the United States, by Howard Zinn, chapter 9, pages 171-180

 

A Renegade History of the United States, by Thaddeus Russell selections from chapter 2 & 3

 

A Patriot's History of the United States, by Larry Schweikart and Michael Allen chapter 9, pages 256-260

In Class:

Life of a slave and what historians say about it.

 

Students examine three different historians that utilize the same data (The records of physical punishment on the Bennet Barrow plantation) to determine how history can be shaped to fit the agenda of the author.

 

Homework:

Boyer: 369-374

 

&/or:

 

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-African American culture of the antebellum south

 

Turn in next class:

 

Optional outside of class enrichment

Preparation for

Day:

62

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: Period 4

Our Topic:

Period 4

Date:

Time:

Location:

Duration:

TBA

4-6pm

Learning Commons

2 hours

Activity:

Review of Key Concepts, Flash Card Cram, Team Quiz
 

Day:

58

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.1

Our Topic:

the lives of African American in slavery

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nationís democratic ideals and

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 369-374

 

Essential Question(s):

CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and
changed over time.

NAT-4.0: Analyze relationships among different regional, social, ethnic, and racial groups, and explain how these groupsí experiences have related to U.S. national identity.

Material to Master:

II. While Americans embraced a new national culture, various groups developed distinctive cultures of their own.

D) Enslaved blacks and free African Americans created
communities and strategies to protect their dignity and
family structures, and they joined political efforts aimed
at changing their status.

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

HBO: Slave Narratives Special with graphic organizer

 

"Unchained Memories"

 

 

Homework:

Boyer: 377-384  

&/or:

Russell: 140-143

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Manifest Destiny

-German Immigrants

-Irish Immigrants

-nativists

-Labor Unions of the mid 19th century

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

59

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.2, 5.1; GPS: SSUSH7b

Our Topic:

Immigration

4.2: Innovations in technology, agriculture, and commerce powerfully accelerated the American economy, precipitating profound changes to U.S. society and to national and regional identities.

5.1: The United States became more connected with the world, pursued an expansionist foreign policy in the Western Hemisphere, and emerged as the destination for many migrants from other countries.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 377-384

Russell: 140-143

 

Essential Question(s):

MIG-1.0: Explain the causes of migration to colonial North America and, later, the United States, and analyze immigrationís effects on U.S. society.
MIG-2.0: Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States, and explain how migration has affected American life.

NAT-4.0: Analyze relationships among different regional, social, ethnic, and racial groups, and explain how these groupsí experiences have related to U.S. national identity.
CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and
changed over time.

Material to Master:

4.2

III. Economic development shaped settlement and trade patterns, helping to unify the nation while also encouraging the growth of different regions.
A) Large numbers of international migrants moved to industrializing northern cities, while many Americans moved west of the Appalachians, developing thriving new
communities along the Ohio and Mississippi rivers.

5.1

II. In the 1840s and 1850s, Americans continued to debate questions about rights and citizenship for various groups of U.S. inhabitants.
A) Substantial numbers of international migrants
continued to arrive in the United States from Europe and Asia, mainly from Ireland and Germany, often settling in ethnic communities where they could preserve elements of their languages and customs.
B) A strongly anti-Catholic nativist movement arose
that was aimed at limiting new immigrantsí political
power and cultural influence.

Documents to be utilized:

A Renegade History of the United States, by Thaddeus Russell selections from chapter 6

In Class:

Complete Jig Saw Lesson:

 

In groups students read documents about immigration law, Irish, German immigrants, nativism, 18th Century immigration, and American Colonization Society then report their findings to the class

Chart

Homework:

Boyer: 384-387; Video

 

&

William Henry Harrison Video & John Tyler Video

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Santa Fe Trail

-Texas Revolution

-Settlement of Oregon

-Mexican American War

-Wilmot Proviso

-Free-Soil Party

-Chinese Immigration (more added later)

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

60

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 4.3, 5.1; SSUSH7b, SSUSH8b,c,d

Our Topic:

Territorial Expansion and Manifest Destiny

4.3: The U.S. interest in increasing foreign trade and
expanding its national borders shaped the nationís foreign policy and spurred government and private initiatives.

5.1: The United States became more connected
with the world, pursued an expansionist foreign policy in the Western Hemisphere, and emerged as the destination for many migrants from other countries.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 384-387

 

Essential Question(s):

MIG-2.0: Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States, and explain how migration has affected American life.

GEO-1.0: Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and
the development of government policies.

WOR-2.0: Analyze the reasons for, and results of, U.S. diplomatic, economic, and military initiatives in North America
and overseas.

Material to Master:

4.3

I. Struggling to create an independent global presence, the United States sought to claim territory throughout the North American continent and promote foreign trade.
A) Following the Louisiana Purchase, the United States
government sought influence and control over North
America and the Western Hemisphere through a
variety of means, including exploration, military actions,
American Indian removal, and diplomatic efforts such
as the Monroe Doctrine.

II. The United Statesís acquisition of lands in the West gave rise to contests over the extension of slavery into new territories.
A) As overcultivation depleted arable land in the Southeast, slaveholders began relocating their plantations
to more fertile lands west of the Appalachians, where
the institution of slavery continued to grow.

5.1

I. Popular enthusiasm for U.S. expansion, bolstered by economic and security interests, resulted in the acquisition of new territories, substantial migration westward, and new overseas initiatives.
A) The desire for access to natural and mineral
resources and the hope of many settlers for
economic opportunities or religious refuge led to an
increased migration to and settlement in the West.
B) Advocates of annexing western lands argued that
Manifest Destiny and the superiority of American
institutions compelled the United States to expand
its borders westward to the Pacific Ocean.
C) The U.S. added large territories in the West
through victory in the MexicanĖAmerican War and
diplomatic negotiations, raising questions about the
status of slavery, American Indians, and Mexicans in
the newly acquired lands.

D) Westward migration was boosted during and after the
Civil War by the passage of new legislation promoting
Western transportation and economic development.
E) U.S. interest in expanding trade led to economic,
diplomatic, and cultural initiatives to create more ties with Asia.

Documents to be utilized:

-Reverend H.W. Bellows, ďThe Destiny of the CountryĒ in American Review (a New York Whig publication), March 1847

-James Buchanan, Secretary of State of the United States, to Thomas O. Larkin, United States Consul and Confidential Agent at Monterey, California

-Report of speech by Congressman James B. Bowlin of Missouri (January 6, 1846)

-President James K. Polk, Fourth Annual Message to Congress (December 5, 1848)

In Class:

AP Insight: Challenge Area II, Building Block C

Performance Task Ė Linking Claims: Effects of Expansionism

 

Self Assessment: AP Insight Student Progress Sheet

 

 

Homework:

AP Insight: Challenge Area II, Building Block C Quiz

 

&

AP Insight: Challenge Area II, Building Block C Quiz Next Step

&

Review Challenge Area II, Building Block A & B lessons to prepare for tomorrow's essay (Days 3 & 35)

Flashcards &/or outlines:

 

Turn in next class:

Outlines and/or flashcards due on test day

 

Optional outside of class enrichment

Preparation for

Day:

61

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 1.2, 3.3, 4.3; SSUSH7b

Our Topic:

Effects of Expansionism

1.2: Contact among Europeans, Native Americans,
and Africans resulted in the Columbian Exchange and significant social, cultural, and political changes on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.

3.3: Migration within North America, cooperative interaction, and competition for resources raised questions about boundaries and policies, intensified conflicts among peoples and nations, and led to contests over the creation of a multiethnic, multiracial national identity.

5.1: The United States became more connected
with the world, pursued an expansionist foreign policy in the Western Hemisphere, and emerged as the destination for many migrants from other countries.

Date:

Time:

Location:

Duration:

TBD

TBD

TBD

1 hour & 15 min

Activity:

AP Insight: Discuss results of Challenge Area II, Building Block C Quiz

 

AP Insight: Challenge Area II Performance Task

 

Day:

61

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

Key Concept: 1.2, 3.3, 4.3; SSUSH7b

Our Topic:

Effects of Expansionism

1.2: Contact among Europeans, Native Americans,
and Africans resulted in the Columbian Exchange and significant social, cultural, and political changes on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.

3.3: Migration within North America, cooperative interaction, and competition for resources raised questions about boundaries and policies, intensified conflicts among peoples and nations, and led to contests over the creation of a multiethnic, multiracial national identity.

5.1: The United States became more connected
with the world, pursued an expansionist foreign policy in the Western Hemisphere, and emerged as the destination for many migrants from other countries.

Required

Pre-Reading:

 

 

Essential Question(s):

GEO-1.0: Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and
the development of government policies.

Skill to Master:

Long Essay: Causation

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

AP Insight: Discuss results of Challenge Area II, Building Block C Quiz

 

Review Long Essay Rubric

 

AP Insight: Challenge Area II Assessment: Long Essay

Homework:

STUDY

 

&/or:

 

&

 

Flashcards:

 

Turn in next class:

 
 

Day:

62

Dates:

1800-1848

Topic #:

 

 

 

Test

Homework: 

Boyer: 407-421 (Most of this material will be covered in class lectures so you can skip this reading and do the flashcards/notes/outline... in class if you need a break from the book)

 

&:

 

&

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-John Brown

-Compromise of 1850

-American (Know Nothing) Party (more later)

-Kansas-Nebraska Act

-Decline of the Whig Party

-Republican Party

-Bleeding Kansas

-Popular Sovereignty

 

Turn in next class: