Mr. Foster & Mr. Hoge's AP US History   

 

AP US History Themes:

Politics and Power

This theme focuses on how different social and political groups have influenced society and government in the United States, as well as how political beliefs and institutions have changed over time.

American and National Identity

This theme focuses on how and why definitions of American and national identity and values have developed, as well as on related topics such as citizenship, constitutionalism, foreign policy, assimilation, and American exceptionalism.

America in the World

This theme focuses on the interactions between nations that affected North American history in the colonial period, and on the influence of the United States on world affairs.

Work, Exchange, and Technology

This theme focuses on the factors behind the development of systems of economic
exchange, particularly the role of technology, economic markets, and government.

Geography and the Environment

This theme focuses on the role of geography and both the natural and human-made environments on social and political developments in what would become the United States.

Migration and Settlement

This theme focuses on why and how the various people who moved to, from, and within
the United States adapted to their new social and physical environments.

Culture and Society

This theme focuses on the roles that ideas, beliefs, social mores, and creative
expression have played in shaping the United States, as well as how various
identities, cultures, and values have been preserved or changed in different
contexts of U.S. history.

Essential Skills

Analyzing Historical Sources and Evidence

Making Historical
Connections
Chronological
Reasoning
Creating and
Supporting an
Argument

Analyzing
Evidence: Content
and Sourcing

Interpretation Comparison Contextualization Synthesis Causation Continuity
and Change over Time
Periodization Argumentation Argumentation: Using
Evidence to Support
an Argument

Hoge's 3rd Period Answer Form

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education funding please send me an email.  I will connect you with the campaign.

 

 

 

Recovery for short answer section of last test - Complete if grade was below a 60%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Google Classroom codes for Hoge:

3rd: 8szgucp

5th: motvc1

AP Curriculum Guide

APUSH Lectures Need a break from the book? TRY THIS

Class Calendar

Hoge's 5th Period Answer Form

 

Rubric's for Essays  

How to write a DBQ

AP Central

 

 

CHS Model United Nations Team

Travel: AP History Field Studies

Centennial High School

 

 

Contact Mr. Hoge

Contact Mr. Foster

Practice Test Questions password is knights

Hennessey & Hoge's AP World History

 

 

Quick Links

Period One from: 1491-1607  -  Period Two from: 1607-1754  -  Period Three from: 1754-1800  -  Period Four from: 1800-1848

Period Five from: 1844-1877Period Six from: 1865-1898 - Period Seven & Six from: 1890-1945 & 1945-1980 - Period Nine from: 1980-today

 

 

Your Guide to Foster & Hoge AP US History

 

Period 1, 1491-1607

On a North American continent controlled by American

Indians, contact among the peoples of Europe, the

Americas, and West Africa created a new world.

 

 

Day:

1

Dates:

1491-1607

Topic #:

Key Concept 1.1:

 

Our Topic:

The Indians

As native populations migrated and settled across the vast expanse of North America over time, they developed distinct and increasingly complex societies by adapting to and transforming their diverse environments.

Required

Pre-Reading:

7 Events That Made America America by Larry Schweikart

 

Essential Question(s):

MIG-2.0: Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States,
and explain how migration has affected American life.

 

Material to Master:

I. Different native societies adapted to and transformed their environments through innovations in agriculture, resource use, and social structure.
A) The spread of maize cultivation from present day
Mexico northward into the present-day American
Southwest and beyond supported economic
development, settlement, advanced irrigation, and
social diversification among societies.
B) Societies responded to the aridity of the Great Basin and the grasslands of the western Great Plains by developing largely mobile lifestyles.
C) In the Northeast, the Mississippi River Valley,
and along the Atlantic seaboard some societies
developed mixed agricultural and hunter gatherer
economies that favored the development
of permanent villages.
D) Societies in the Northwest and present-day California supported themselves by hunting and gathering, and in some areas developed settled communities supported by the vast resources of the ocean.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

 

Welcome, expectations, website, books...

AP Themes and Course Organization

 

Syllabus

 

Receive directions for homework on Native American Societies

Homework:

Purchase A People's History of the U.S. by Howard Zinn (any edition after 1999)

 

&

Watch this Video

 

&

One section of Native American Society Table (complete section that corresponds to your seat number)

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Pre-Columbian Agriculture

-Natives of the Southwest (include summary of economy, culture and government)

-Natives of the Eastern Woodlands (include summary of economy, culture and government)

-Nonfarming Native societies (include summary of economy, culture and government)

 

Turn in next class:

Complete your section of table table

 

 

 

Day:

2

Dates:

1491-1607

Topic #:

Key Concept 1.1:

 

Our Topic:

The Indians

As native populations migrated and settled across the vast expanse of North America over time, they developed distinct and increasingly complex societies by adapting to and transforming their diverse environments.

Required

Pre-Reading:

 

 

Essential Question(s):

GEO-1.0: Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and the development of government policies.

 

Material to Master:

I. Different native societies adapted to and transformed their environments through innovations in agriculture, resource use, and social structure.
A) The spread of maize cultivation from present day
Mexico northward into the present-day American
Southwest and beyond supported economic
development, settlement, advanced irrigation, and
social diversification among societies.
B) Societies responded to the aridity of the Great Basin and the grasslands of the western Great Plains by developing largely mobile lifestyles.
C) In the Northeast, the Mississippi River Valley,
and along the Atlantic seaboard some societies
developed mixed agricultural and hunter gatherer
economies that favored the development
of permanent villages.
D) Societies in the Northwest and present-day California supported themselves by hunting and gathering, and in some areas developed settled communities supported by the vast resources of the ocean.

Documents to be utilized:

History for the Future Interview with Charles Mann by Kevin Brown about 1491, Revelations of the Americas before Columbus

 

In Class:

Students create a political map of the Pre-Columbian America that includes the following:

- Population density

- Subsistence patterns

- Urban centers

Native American Society Table

Homework:

Listen to this Podcast

 

 

&

watch this video

 

&/or:

 

 

Flashcards  &/or outlines:

-The Columbian Exchange

-Casta System

-joint-stock company (see page 30 in Boyer)

 

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

3

Dates:

1491-1607

Topic #:

Key Concept 1.2

 

Our Topic:

The Columbian Exchange

Contact among Europeans, Native Americans,
and Africans resulted in the Columbian Exchange and significant social, cultural, and political changes on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.

Required

Pre-Reading:

History for the Future Interview with Charles Mann by Kevin Brown about 1491, Revelations of the Americas before Columbus

 

 

Essential Question(s):

WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.
WXT-3.0: Analyze how technological innovation has affected economic development and society.
WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

MIG-1.0: Explain the causes of migration to colonial North America and, later, the United States, and analyze immigration’s effects on U.S. society.
WXT-1.0: Explain how different labor systems developed in North America and the United States, and explain their effects on workers’ lives and U.S. society.
GEO-1.0: Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and the development of government policies.

 

Material to Master:

I. European expansion into the Western Hemisphere generated intense social, religious, political, and economic competition and changes within European societies.
A) European nations’ efforts to explore and conquer the
New World stemmed from a search for new sources
of wealth, economic and military competition, and a
desire to spread Christianity.
B) The Columbian Exchange brought new crops to
Europe from the Americas, stimulating European
population growth, and new sources of mineral
wealth, which facilitated the European shift from
feudalism to capitalism.
C) Improvements in maritime technology and more
organized methods for conducting international
trade, such as joint-stock companies, helped drive
changes to economies in Europe and the Americas.

II. The Columbian Exchange and development of the Spanish Empire in the Western Hemisphere resulted in extensive demographic, economic, and social changes.
A) Spanish exploration and conquest of the Americas
were accompanied and furthered by widespread
deadly epidemics that devastated native
populations and by the introduction of crops
and animals not found in the Americas.
B) In the encomienda system, Spanish colonial economies marshaled Native American labor to support plantation based agriculture and extract precious metals
and other resources.
C) European traders partnered with some West African
groups who practiced slavery to forcibly extract slave
labor for the Americas. The Spanish imported enslaved
Africans to labor in plantation agriculture and mining.
D) The Spanish developed a caste system that
incorporated, and carefully defined the status of,
the diverse population of Europeans, Africans,
and Native Americans in their empire.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

 

Columbian Exchange

Homework:

Boyer: 33-35, 38-41,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flashcards  &/or outlines:

-New Slavery

-encomienda system

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

4

Dates:

1491-1607

Topic #:

Key Concept 1.2

 

Our Topic:

Cross Cultural Encounters

Contact among Europeans, Native Americans,
and Africans resulted in the Columbian Exchange and significant social, cultural, and political changes on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 31-35

 

 

Essential Question(s):

CUL-1.0: Explain how religious groups and ideas have affected American society and political life.
CUL-3.0: Explain how ideas about women’s rights and gender roles have affected society and politics.
CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and changed over time.

 

Material to Master:

III. In their interactions, Europeans and Native Americans asserted divergent worldviews regarding issues such as religion, gender roles, family, land use,
and power.
A) Mutual misunderstandings between Europeans and
Native Americans often defined the early years
of interaction and trade as each group sought to
make sense of the other. Over time, Europeans and
Native Americans adopted some useful aspects of
each other’s culture.
C) Extended contact with Native Americans and Africans fostered a debate among European religious and political leaders about how non-Europeans should be treated, as well as evolving religious, cultural, and
racial justifications for the subjugation of Africans
and Native Americans.

Documents to be utilized:

-Letter to Sir Simonds D' Ewes from John Winthrop, July 21, 1634

-Juan Gines de Sepulveda, Spanish Journal on the Indians, 1547

-Bartolome de Las Casa, On the Destruction of the Indies, 1540’s

 

In Class:

 

Mini DBQ

Homework:

Boyer: 42-46, 82-86

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flashcards  &/or outlines:

-The Pueblo Revolt

-New France

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

5

Dates:

1491-1607

Topic #:

Key Concept 1.2, 2.1; GPS SSUSH1d

 

Our Topic:

Spanish Colonization 

Contact among Europeans, Native Americans,
and Africans resulted in the Columbian Exchange and significant social, cultural, and political changes on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.

 

Europeans developed a variety of colonization and migration patterns, influenced by different imperial goals, cultures, and the varied North American environments where they settled, and they competed with each other and American Indians for resources.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 42-46, 82-86

 

 

Essential Question(s):

WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and
changed over time.

 

Material to Master:

1.2.III. In their interactions, Europeans and Native Americans asserted divergent worldviews regarding issues such as religion, gender roles, family, land use,
and power.

B) As European encroachments on Native Americans’ lands and demands on their labor increased, native
peoples sought to defend and maintain their political
sovereignty, economic prosperity, religious beliefs, and concepts of gender relations through diplomatic negotiations and military resistance.

2.1.I. Spanish, French, Dutch, and British colonizers had different economic and imperial goals involving land and labor that shaped the social and political development of
their colonies as well as their relationships with native populations.
A) Spanish efforts to extract wealth from the land led
them to develop institutions based on subjugating native
populations, converting them to Christianity,
and incorporating them, along with enslaved and
free Africans, into the Spanish colonial society.

III. Competition over resources between European rivals and American Indians encouraged industry and trade and led to conflict in the Americas.

F) American Indian resistance to Spanish colonizing efforts in North America, particularly after the Pueblo Revolt,
led to Spanish accommodation of some aspects of American Indian culture in the Southwest.

Documents to be utilized:

Letter of the governor and captain-general, Don Antonio de Otermin, from New Mexico, in which he gives him a full account of what has happened to him since the day the Indians surrounded him. [September 8, 1680.]

 

In Class:

Using primary source documents to write history.

 

Students use an account of the Pueblo Revolt to describe the political, economic, demographic, and cultural landscape of the Spanish colony of New Mexico

 

Homework:

Boyer: 46-48, 68-74

 

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines

-Virginia Company of Plymouth

-Virginia Company of London

-Jamestown/Virginia Colony

-Tobacco

-Indentured Servants

-Anglo-Powhatan Wars

-Act of Religious Toleration 1649

-Bacon's Rebellion

-Puritans

-House of Burgesses

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

Period 2, 1607-1754

Europeans and American Indians maneuvered and

fought for dominance, control, and security in North America,

and distinctive colonial and native societies emerged.

 

 

Day:

6

Dates:

1607-1754

Topic #:

Key Concept 2.1; GPS SSUS1

 

Our Topic:

 Overview of Colonial Period

Europeans developed a variety of colonization and migration patterns, influenced by different imperial goals, cultures, and the varied North American environments where they settled, and they competed with each other and American Indians for resources.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 46-48, 68-74

 

 

Essential Question(s):

WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.
WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.
MIG-1.0: Explain the causes of migration to colonial North America and, later, the United States, and analyze immigration’s effects on U.S. society.
MIG-2.0: Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States, and explain how migration has affected American life.
GEO-1.0: Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and the development of government policies.

CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and changed over time.

 

Material to Master:

I. Spanish, French, Dutch, and British colonizers had different economic and imperial goals involving land and labor that shaped the social and political development of their colonies as well as their relationships with native populations.
A) Spanish efforts to extract wealth from the land led
them to develop institutions based on subjugating native populations, converting them to Christianity,
and incorporating them, along with enslaved and
free Africans, into the Spanish colonial society.
B) French and Dutch colonial efforts involved relatively
few Europeans and relied on trade alliances and intermarriage with American Indians to build economic and diplomatic relationships and acquire furs and other products for export to Europe.
C) English colonization efforts attracted a comparatively large number of male and female British migrants, as well as other European migrants, all of whom sought social mobility, economic prosperity,
religious freedom, and improved living conditions.
These colonists focused on agriculture and settled
on land taken from Native Americans, from whom
they lived separately.

II. In the 17th century, early British colonies developed along the Atlantic coast, with regional differences that reflected various environmental, economic, cultural, and demographic factors.
A) The Chesapeake and North Carolina colonies grew prosperous exporting tobacco — a labor-intensive
product initially cultivated by white, mostly male indentured servants and later by enslaved Africans.
B) The New England colonies, initially settled by Puritans, developed around small towns with family farms and achieved a thriving mixed economy of
agriculture and commerce.
C) The middle colonies supported a flourishing export economy based on cereal crops and attracted
a broad range of European migrants, leading to societies with greater cultural, ethnic, and religious diversity and tolerance.
D) The colonies of the southernmost Atlantic coast and the British West Indies used long growing seasons to
develop plantation economies based on exporting staple crops. They depended on the labor of enslaved
Africans, who often constituted the majority of the population in these areas and developed their own forms of cultural and religious autonomy.
E) Distance and Britain’s initially lax attention led to the colonies creating self-governing institutions that were
unusually democratic for the era. The New England colonies based power in participatory town meetings,
which in turn elected members to their colonial legislatures; in the Southern colonies, elite planters
exercised local authority and also dominated the elected assemblies.

III. Competition over resources between European rivals and American Indians encouraged industry and trade and led to conflict in the Americas.

C) Interactions between European rivals and American Indian populations fostered both accommodation and conflict. French, Dutch, British, and Spanish colonies allied with and armed American Indian groups, who frequently sought alliances with Europeans against other Indian groups.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

Map Lecture

Homework:

start readings for days 7-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

 

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

7

Dates:

1607-1754

Topic #:

Key Concept 2.1; GPS SSUSH1a

 

Our Topic:

Chesapeake & New England Colonies

Europeans developed a variety of colonization and migration patterns, influenced by different imperial goals, cultures, and the varied North American environments where they settled, and they competed with each other and American Indians for resources.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 46-48, 68-74

 

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.
WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.
MIG-1.0: Explain the causes of migration to colonial North America and, later, the United States, and analyze immigration’s effects on U.S. society.
MIG-2.0: Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States, and explain how migration has affected American life.

GEO-1.0: Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and the development of government policies.

CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and changed over time.

 

Material to Master:

I. Spanish, French, Dutch, and British colonizers had different economic and imperial goals involving land and labor that shaped the social and political development of their colonies as well as their relationships with native populations.

C) English colonization efforts attracted a comparatively large number of male and female British migrants, as well as other European migrants, all of whom sought social mobility, economic prosperity,
religious freedom, and improved living conditions.
These colonists focused on agriculture and settled
on land taken from Native Americans, from whom
they lived separately.

II. In the 17th century, early British colonies developed along the Atlantic coast, with regional differences that reflected various environmental, economic, cultural, and demographic factors.
A) The Chesapeake and North Carolina colonies grew prosperous exporting tobacco — a labor-intensive
product initially cultivated by white, mostly male indentured servants and later by enslaved Africans.
B) The New England colonies, initially settled by Puritans, developed around small towns with family farms and achieved a thriving mixed economy of
agriculture and commerce.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

Class Recap: students are randomly called on to retell the history of Virginia in chronological order.

 

1993 DBQ: Comparison of New England and Chesapeake

 

Students work through documents on Chesapeake region, determine how they can be used and infuse each with outside historical information.

 

To be continued on day 9

 

Homework:

Zinn:  23-38 (Chapter 2 Drawing the Color Line)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Racial Slavery

-Reasons Slaves replaced Indentured Servants

-Stono Rebellion

 

Turn in next class:

Socratic Seminar

Guiding questions:

Why did slavery take hold in Virginia?

Why were the slaves black?

How did blacks respond to slavery

Why does Zinn ask if racism "was...the result of a "natural" antipathy of white against black?"

Was racism created in colonial Virginia? 

 

 

 

Day:

8

Dates:

1607-1754

Topic #:

Key Concept 2.1; GPS SSUSH1a, SSUSH2b

 

Our Topic:

Chesapeake Colonies

2.2 The British colonies participated in political, social, cultural, and economic exchanges with Great Britain that encouraged both stronger bonds with Britain and resistance to Britain’s control.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Zinn:  21-38 (Chapter 2 Drawing the Color Line)

 

 

Essential Question(s):

WXT-1.0: Explain how different labor systems developed in North America and the United States, and explain their effects on workers’ lives and U.S. society.
CUL-3.0: Explain how ideas about women’s rights and gender roles have affected society and politics.
CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and
changed over time.
WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

 

Material to Master:

II. Like other European empires in the Americas that participated in the Atlantic slave trade, the English colonies developed a system of slavery that reflected
the specific economic, demographic, and geographic characteristics of those colonies.

A) All the British colonies participated to varying degrees in the Atlantic slave trade due to the abundance of land and a growing European demand
for colonial goods, as well as a shortage of indentured
servants. Small New England farms used relatively few enslaved laborers, all port cities held significant
minorities of enslaved people, and the emerging plantation systems of the Chesapeake and the southernmost Atlantic coast had large numbers of enslaved workers, while the great majority of enslaved Africans were sent to the West Indies.
B) As chattel slavery became the dominant labor system in many southern colonies, new laws created a strict racial system that prohibited interracial relationships and defined the descendants of African American mothers as black and enslaved in perpetuity.
C) Africans developed both overt and covert means to resist the dehumanizing aspects of slavery and maintain their family and gender systems, culture, and religion.

Documents to be utilized:

A People's History of the United States 1492-Present, by Howard Zinn, chapter 2

 

In Class:

Socratic Seminar

Guiding questions:

1. Why did slavery take hold in Virginia?

2. Why were the slaves black?

3. How did blacks respond to slavery

4. Why does Zinn ask if racism "was...the result of a "natural" antipathy of white against black?"

5. Was racism created in colonial Virginia? 

 

Seminar Expectations

Homework:

Boyer: 48-63

 

 

Optional

Video & Video

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-New England Colonies

-New Amsterdam

-The New England Way

-Rhode Island Colony

-Half-Way Covenant

-Praying Towns

-King Phillips War

 

Turn in next class:

Turn in flash cards &/or outlines tomorrow

 

 

 

Day:

9

Dates:

1607-1754

Topic #:

Key Concept 2.1, 2.2; GPS SSUSH1b,e

 

Our Topic:

Chesapeake & New England Colonies

Europeans developed a variety of colonization and migration patterns, influenced by different imperial goals, cultures, and the varied North American environments where they settled, and they competed with each other and American Indians for resources.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 48-63

 

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.
WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.
MIG-1.0: Explain the causes of migration to colonial North America and, later, the United States, and analyze immigration’s effects on U.S. society.
MIG-2.0: Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States, and explain how migration has affected American life.

GEO-1.0: Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and the development of government policies.

CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and changed over time.

 

Material to Master:

I. Spanish, French, Dutch, and British colonizers had different economic and imperial goals involving land and labor that shaped the social and political development of their colonies as well as their relationships with native populations.

C) English colonization efforts attracted a comparatively large number of male and female British migrants, as well as other European migrants, all of whom sought social mobility, economic prosperity,
religious freedom, and improved living conditions.
These colonists focused on agriculture and settled
on land taken from Native Americans, from whom
they lived separately.

II. In the 17th century, early British colonies developed along the Atlantic coast, with regional differences that reflected various environmental, economic, cultural, and demographic factors.
A) The Chesapeake and North Carolina colonies grew prosperous exporting tobacco — a labor-intensive
product initially cultivated by white, mostly male indentured servants and later by enslaved Africans.
B) The New England colonies, initially settled by Puritans, developed around small towns with family farms and achieved a thriving mixed economy of
agriculture and commerce.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

-flash card/outline check

 

1993 DBQ: Comparison of New England and Chesapeake

 

Students work through documents on New England region, determine how they can be used and infuse each with outside historical information.

 

TEST on Summer Reading

Homework:

Gingrich: 17-35 & Vowell: 1-6; 24-26

 

 

&

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

 

 

Turn in next class:

Socratic Seminar

Guiding Questions:

1. What is American Exceptionalism?

2. What are the origins of this idea?

3. How has it and how does it continue to shape our history?

4. How do Vowell and Gingrich view this idea?

5. How does patriotism shape the writing of history?

 

 

 

 

Day:

10

Dates:

1607-1754

Topic #:

Key Concept 2.1, 2.2; GPS SSUSH1b,e

 

Our Topic:

American Exceptionalism

2.1 Europeans developed a variety of colonization and migration patterns, influenced by different imperial goals, cultures, and the varied North American environments where they settled, and they competed with each other and American Indians for resources.

2.2 The British colonies participated in political, social, cultural, and economic exchanges with Great Britain that encouraged both stronger bonds with Britain and resistance to Britain’s control.

Required

Pre-Reading:

The Wordy Shipmates by Sarah Vowell?

A Nation Like No Other, Why American Exceptionalism Matters by Newt Gingrich, chapter 1

 

 

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.

 

Material to Master:

II. In the 17th century, early British colonies developed along the Atlantic coast, with regional differences that reflected various environmental, economic, cultural, and demographic factors.
B) The New England colonies, initially settled by Puritans, developed around small towns with family farms and achieved a thriving mixed economy of
agriculture and commerce.
E) Distance and Britain’s initially lax attention led to the colonies creating self-governing institutions that were
unusually democratic for the era. The New England colonies based power in participatory town meetings,
which in turn elected members to their colonial legislatures; in the Southern colonies, elite planters
exercised local authority and also dominated the elected assemblies.

I. Transatlantic commercial, religious, philosophical, and political exchanges led
residents of the British colonies to evolve in their political and cultural attitudes as
they became increasingly tied to Britain and one another.

D) Colonists’ resistance to imperial control drew on
local experiences of self-government, evolving ideas
of liberty, the political thought of the Enlightenment, greater religious independence and diversity, and an ideology critical of perceived corruption in the imperial system.

Documents to be utilized:

The Wordy Shipmates by Sarah Vowell

A Nation Like No Other, Why American Exceptionalism Matters by Newt Gingrich, chapter 1

 

In Class:

Socratic Seminar

Guiding Questions:

1. What is American Exceptionalism?

2. What are the origins of this idea?

3. How has it and how does it continue to shape our history?

4. How do Vowell and Gingrich view this idea?

5. How does patriotism shape the writing of history?

 

Seminar Expectations

Homework:

Boyer: 63-68

 

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Salem Witch Trials

 

Turn in next class:

FRQ Quick Write

Question: In the seventeenth century, New England Puritans tried to create a model society.  What were their aspirations, and to what extent were those aspirations fulfilled during the seventeenth century?

Format

 

 

 

 

 

Day:

11

Dates:

1607-1754

Topic #:

Key Concept 2.1; GPS SSUSH1b,e

 

Our Topic:

New England Colonies

2.1: Europeans developed a variety of colonization and migration patterns, influenced by different imperial goals, cultures, and the varied North American environments where they settled, and
they competed with each other and American Indians for resources.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 63-68

 

 

Essential Question(s):

WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and
changed over time.

 

Material to Master:

2.1

I. Spanish, French, Dutch, and British colonizers had different economic and imperial goals involving land and labor that shaped the social and political development of
their colonies as well as their relationships with native populations.

C) English colonization efforts attracted a comparatively
large number of male and female British migrants,
as well as other European migrants, all of whom
sought social mobility, economic prosperity, religious freedom, and improved living conditions. These colonists focused on agriculture and settled on land taken from Native Americans, from whom they lived separately.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

Salem Witch Trials

 

Students read primary source accounts of Salem witch trials to find evidence to support an answer to this questions

 

Throughout the colonial period, economic concerns had more to do with the settling of British North America than did religious concerns.  Assess the validity of this statement with specific reference to economic and religious concerns.

Homework:

Boyer: 75-82

 

 

&/or:

Video

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Carolina Colony

-New Netherlands

-Pennsylvania Colony

-Mid-Atlantic Colony

 

Turn in next class:

Bring textbook to class

 

 

 

Day:

12

Dates:

1607-1754

Topic #:

Key Concept 2.1, 2.2; GPS SSUSH1c

 

Our Topic:

Overview of English Colonial Period

Europeans developed a variety of colonization and migration patterns, influenced by different imperial goals, cultures, and the varied North American environments where they settled, and they competed with each other and American Indians for resources.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 75-82

 

 

Essential Question(s):

WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.
WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.
MIG-1.0: Explain the causes of migration to colonial North America and, later, the United States, and analyze immigration’s effects on U.S. society.
MIG-2.0: Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States, and explain how migration has affected American life.
GEO-1.0: Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and the development of government policies.

CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and changed over time.

 

Material to Master:

I. Spanish, French, Dutch, and British colonizers had different economic and imperial goals involving land and labor that shaped the social and political development of their colonies as well as their relationships with native populations.
C) English colonization efforts attracted a comparatively large number of male and female British migrants, as well as other European migrants, all of whom sought social mobility, economic prosperity,
religious freedom, and improved living conditions.
These colonists focused on agriculture and settled
on land taken from Native Americans, from whom
they lived separately.

II. In the 17th century, early British colonies developed along the Atlantic coast, with regional differences that reflected various environmental, economic, cultural, and demographic factors.
A) The Chesapeake and North Carolina colonies grew prosperous exporting tobacco — a labor-intensive
product initially cultivated by white, mostly male indentured servants and later by enslaved Africans.
B) The New England colonies, initially settled by Puritans, developed around small towns with family farms and achieved a thriving mixed economy of
agriculture and commerce.
C) The middle colonies supported a flourishing export economy based on cereal crops and attracted
a broad range of European migrants, leading to societies with greater cultural, ethnic, and religious diversity and tolerance.
D) The colonies of the southernmost Atlantic coast and the British West Indies used long growing seasons to
develop plantation economies based on exporting staple crops. They depended on the labor of enslaved
Africans, who often constituted the majority of the population in these areas and developed their own forms of cultural and religious autonomy.
E) Distance and Britain’s initially lax attention led to the colonies creating self-governing institutions that were
unusually democratic for the era. The New England colonies based power in participatory town meetings,
which in turn elected members to their colonial legislatures; in the Southern colonies, elite planters
exercised local authority and also dominated the elected assemblies.

III. Competition over resources between European rivals and American Indians encouraged industry and trade and led to conflict in the Americas.

C) Interactions between European rivals and American Indian populations fostered both accommodation and conflict. French, Dutch, British, and Spanish colonies allied with and armed American Indian groups, who frequently sought alliances with Europeans against other Indian groups.

E) British conflicts with American Indians over land, resources, and political boundaries led to military
confrontations, such as Metacom’s War (King Philip’s War) in New England.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

Project: Picture of Colonial America

Homework:

   

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

 

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

12b

Dates:

1607-1754

Topic #:

Key Concept 2.1

 

Our Topic:

Overview of English Colonial Period

Europeans developed a variety of colonization and migration patterns, influenced by different imperial goals, cultures, and the varied North American environments where they settled, and they competed with each other and American Indians for resources.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 75-82

 

 

Essential Question(s):

WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.
WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.
MIG-1.0: Explain the causes of migration to colonial North America and, later, the United States, and analyze immigration’s effects on U.S. society.
MIG-2.0: Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States, and explain how migration has affected American life.
GEO-1.0: Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and the development of government policies.

CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and changed over time.

 

Material to Master:

I. Spanish, French, Dutch, and British colonizers had different economic and imperial goals involving land and labor that shaped the social and political development of their colonies as well as their relationships with native populations.
C) English colonization efforts attracted a comparatively large number of male and female British migrants, as well as other European migrants, all of whom sought social mobility, economic prosperity,
religious freedom, and improved living conditions.
These colonists focused on agriculture and settled
on land taken from Native Americans, from whom
they lived separately.

II. In the 17th century, early British colonies developed along the Atlantic coast, with regional differences that reflected various environmental, economic, cultural, and demographic factors.
A) The Chesapeake and North Carolina colonies grew prosperous exporting tobacco — a labor-intensive
product initially cultivated by white, mostly male indentured servants and later by enslaved Africans.
B) The New England colonies, initially settled by Puritans, developed around small towns with family farms and achieved a thriving mixed economy of
agriculture and commerce.
C) The middle colonies supported a flourishing export economy based on cereal crops and attracted
a broad range of European migrants, leading to societies with greater cultural, ethnic, and religious diversity and tolerance.
D) The colonies of the southernmost Atlantic coast and the British West Indies used long growing seasons to
develop plantation economies based on exporting staple crops. They depended on the labor of enslaved
Africans, who often constituted the majority of the population in these areas and developed their own forms of cultural and religious autonomy.
E) Distance and Britain’s initially lax attention led to the colonies creating self-governing institutions that were
unusually democratic for the era. The New England colonies based power in participatory town meetings,
which in turn elected members to their colonial legislatures; in the Southern colonies, elite planters
exercised local authority and also dominated the elected assemblies.

III. Competition over resources between European rivals and American Indians encouraged industry and trade and led to conflict in the Americas.

C) Interactions between European rivals and American Indian populations fostered both accommodation and conflict. French, Dutch, British, and Spanish colonies allied with and armed American Indian groups, who frequently sought alliances with Europeans against other Indian groups.

E) British conflicts with American Indians over land, resources, and political boundaries led to military
confrontations, such as Metacom’s War (King Philip’s War) in New England.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

Project: Picture of Colonial America

Homework:

Boyer: 89-100

 

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-The Glorious Revolution (include impact on colonies)

-Mercantilism

-Navigation Acts of 1660 and 1663

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

13

Dates:

1607-1754

Topic #:

Key Concept 2.1, 2.2, 2.3: GPS SSUSH2a,

 

Our Topic:

The relationship between England and her Colonies

2.1: Europeans developed a variety of colonization and migration patterns, influenced by different imperial goals, cultures, and the varied North American environments where they settled, and they competed with each other and American Indians for resources.

2.2: The British colonies participated in political, social, cultural, and economic exchanges with Great Britain that encouraged both stronger bonds with Britain and resistance to Britain’s control.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 89-100

 

 

Essential Question(s):

WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations,
and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.

WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.

CUL-2.0: Explain how artistic, philosophical, and scientific ideas have developed and shaped society and institutions.

 

Material to Master:

2.1

III. Competition over resources between European rivals and American Indians encouraged industry and trade and led to conflict in the Americas.

A) An Atlantic economy developed in which goods, as well as enslaved Africans and American Indians, were exchanged between Europe, Africa, and the Americas
through extensive trade networks. European colonial economies focused on acquiring, producing, and exporting
commodities that were valued in Europe and gaining new sources of labor.

C) Interactions between European rivals and American Indian populations fostered both accommodation and conflict. French, Dutch, British, and Spanish colonies allied
with and armed American Indian groups, who frequently sought alliances with Europeans against other Indian groups.

D) The goals and interests of European leaders and colonists at times diverged, leading to a growing mistrust
on both sides of the Atlantic. Colonists, especially in British North America, expressed dissatisfaction over issues
including territorial settlements, frontier defense, self-rule, and trade.

2.2

I. Transatlantic commercial, religious, philosophical, and political exchanges led residents of the British colonies to evolve in their political and cultural attitudes as
they became increasingly tied to Britain and one another.

A) The presence of different European religious and ethnic
groups contributed to a significant degree of pluralism
and intellectual exchange, which were later enhanced
by the first Great Awakening and the spread of European
Enlightenment ideas.

B) The British colonies experienced a gradual Anglicization over time, developing autonomous political communities based on English models with influence from intercolonial
commercial ties, the emergence of a trans-Atlantic print
culture, and the spread of Protestant evangelicalism.

C) The British government increasingly attempted to
incorporate its North American colonies into a coherent,
hierarchical, and imperial structure in order to pursue
mercantilist economic aims, but conflicts with colonists
and American Indians led to erratic enforcement
of imperial policies.

D) Colonists’ resistance to imperial control drew on
local experiences of self-government, evolving ideas
of liberty, the political thought of the Enlightenment, greater religious independence and diversity, and an ideology critical of perceived corruption in the imperial system.

Documents to be utilized:

A Patriot's History of the United States from Columbus's Great Discovery to the War on Terror by Larry Schweikart and Michael Allen, chapter 1

 

In Class:

Students create a graphic organizer to summarize reading

 

 Schweikart & Allen's  argument about the legacy of the early colonial period

 

Homework:

Boyer: 100-108

 

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Slavery Colonial America

-Social Class in Colonial America

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

14

Dates:

1607-1754

Topic #:

Key Concept 2.1, 2.2, GPS SSUSH1, 2

 

Our Topic:

Review of Colonial Diversity

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 100-108

 

 

Essential Question(s):

See days 7-13

 

Material to Master:

Review of days 7-13

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

-students read descriptions and view pictures of the four colonial regions and must identify which region it is

 

-students complete a 3 way venn diagram comparing French, Spanish and English colonialism in North America

 

-students complete a 4 way venn diagram comparing the 4 colonial regions

Homework:

Boyer: 109-114

 

 

&

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Georgia Colony

-King George's War

-Covenant Chain

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

15

Dates:

1607-1754

Topic #:

Key Concept 2.1, 2.2; SSUSH2c

 

Our Topic:

The relationship between the crown, colonists, and Indians

2.1: Europeans developed a variety of colonization and migration patterns, influenced by different imperial goals, cultures, and the varied North American environments where they settled, and
they competed with each other and American Indians for resources.

2.2: The British colonies participated in political, social, cultural, and economic exchanges with Great Britain that encouraged both stronger bonds with Britain and resistance to Britain’s control.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 109-114

 

 

Essential Question(s):

WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of
cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.

 

Material to Master:

2.1

I. Spanish, French, Dutch, and British colonizers had different economic and imperial goals involving land and labor that shaped the social and political development of their colonies as well as their relationships with native populations.
C) English colonization efforts attracted a comparatively large number of male and female British migrants, as well as other European migrants, all of whom sought social mobility, economic prosperity, religious freedom, and improved living conditions. These colonists focused on agriculture and settled on land taken from Native Americans, from whom they lived separately.

III. Competition over resources between European rivals and American Indians encouraged industry and trade and led to conflict in the Americas.

B) Continuing trade with Europeans increased the flow of goods in and out of American Indian communities,
stimulating cultural and economic changes and spreading epidemic diseases that caused radical demographic shifts.

C) Interactions between European rivals and American Indian populations fostered both accommodation and conflict. French, Dutch, British, and Spanish colonies allied
with and armed American Indian groups, who frequently sought alliances with Europeans against other Indian groups.

D) The goals and interests of European leaders and colonists at times diverged, leading to a growing mistrust
on both sides of the Atlantic. Colonists, especially in British North America, expressed dissatisfaction over issues
including territorial settlements, frontier defense, self-rule, and trade.

E) British conflicts with American Indians over land, resources, and political boundaries led to military
confrontations, such as Metacom’s War (King Philip’s War) in New England.

2.2

I. Transatlantic commercial, religious, philosophical, and political exchanges led residents of the British colonies to evolve in their political and cultural attitudes as they became increasingly tied to Britain and one another.

B) The British colonies experienced a gradual Anglicization over time, developing autonomous political communities based on English models with influence from intercolonial
commercial ties, the emergence of a trans-Atlantic print
culture, and the spread of Protestant evangelicalism.

II. Like other European empires in the Americas that participated in the Atlanticslave trade, the English colonies developed a system of slavery that reflected the specific economic, demographic, and geographic characteristics of those colonies.

B) As chattel slavery became the dominant labor system
in many southern colonies, new laws created a strict
racial system that prohibited interracial relationships and
defined the descendants of African American mothers as black and enslaved in perpetuity.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

students work in groups of 3

 

-each student assumes the role of either a colonist, Indian or the crown

-individually they read and annotate documents on the goals and concerns of the colonists, Indians or the crown

-as a group they identify the potential problems that might result from their interaction

-as a group the negotiate a treaty to prevent conflicts caused my these problems

 

- they test their treaty to see if it would have worked to prevent the

War of Jenkins Ear and King George's War

 

PDF of classwork

Homework:

Boyer: 114-117 & video

 

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Colonial Governments 1689-1750

-Benjamin Franklin

-Thomas Jefferson

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

16

Dates:

1607-1754

Topic #:

Key Concept 2.1, 2.2; GPS SSUSH2c

 

Our Topic:

The Enlightenment and Colonial Government

2.1: Europeans developed a variety of colonization and migration patterns, influenced by different imperial goals, cultures, and the varied North American environments where they settled, and
they competed with each other and American Indians for resources.

2.2: The British colonies participated in political, social, cultural, and economic exchanges with Great Britain that encouraged both stronger bonds with Britain and resistance to Britain’s control.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 114-117

 

 

Essential Question(s):

WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of
cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.

POL-1.0: Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed and changed.

CUL-2.0: Explain how artistic, philosophical, and scientific ideas have developed and shaped society and institutions.

 

Material to Master:

2.1

III. Competition over resources between European rivals and American Indians encouraged industry and trade and led to conflict in the Americas.

D) The goals and interests of European leaders and colonists at times diverged, leading to a growing mistrust
on both sides of the Atlantic. Colonists, especially in British North America, expressed dissatisfaction over issues
including territorial settlements, frontier defense, self-rule, and trade.

2.2

I. Transatlantic commercial, religious, philosophical, and political exchanges led residents of the British colonies to evolve in their political and cultural attitudes as
they became increasingly tied to Britain and one another.

A) The presence of different European religious and ethnic
groups contributed to a significant degree of pluralism
and intellectual exchange, which were later enhanced
by the first Great Awakening and the spread of European
Enlightenment ideas.

B) The British colonies experienced a gradual Anglicization over time, developing autonomous political communities based on English models with influence from intercolonial
commercial ties, the emergence of a trans-Atlantic print
culture, and the spread of Protestant evangelicalism.

D) Colonists’ resistance to imperial control drew on
local experiences of self-government, evolving ideas
of liberty, the political thought of the Enlightenment, greater religious independence and diversity, and an ideology critical of perceived corruption in the imperial system.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

In groups of three students determine if the demands for local control and representative government in the English colonies caused by the European Enlightenment or English Colonial policy?

Homework:

Boyer: 117-120

 

 

&

Read, annotate, bring to class

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-The Great Awakening

 

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

17

Dates:

1607-1754

Topic #:

Key Concept 2.2; GPS SSUS2d

 

Our Topic:

The Great Awakening

2.2: The British colonies participated in political, social, cultural, and economic exchanges with Great Britain that encouraged both stronger bonds with Britain and resistance to Britain’s control.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 117-120

 

 

Essential Question(s):

CUL-1.0: Explain how religious groups and ideas have affected American society and political life.

 

Material to Master:

I. Transatlantic commercial, religious, philosophical, and political exchanges led
residents of the British colonies to evolve in their political and cultural attitudes as they became increasingly tied to Britain and one another.
A) The presence of different European religious and ethnic groups contributed to a significant degree of pluralism and intellectual exchange,
which were later enhanced by the first Great Awakening and the spread of European Enlightenment ideas.
B) The British colonies experienced a gradual Anglicization over time, developing autonomous
political communities based on English models with influence from intercolonial commercial ties, the emergence of a trans-Atlantic print
culture, and the spread of Protestant evangelicalism.

Documents to be utilized:

-Jonathan Edwards: On the Great Awakening, December 12, 1743

 

In Class:

In class they will read and annotate primary documents from the Great Awakening and then we will have a discussion on the following questions:

  1. What was the demographic of the people targeted by The Great Awakening? Why were these people targeted?

  2. How was The Great Awakening different from earlier Puritan doctrines?

  3. Why were the Great Awakening leaders such as George Whitefield and Jonathan Edwards so popular?

  4. Why did The Great Awakening take hold in America?

With a partner students will practice periodization and causation thesis statements.

 

Homework:

Boyer: 123-128

 

 

&

Video

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Seven Years War aka French and Indian War

-1763 Treaty of Paris

-Treaty of Easton

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Period 3, 1754-1800

British imperial attempts to reassert control over its colonies

and the colonial reaction to these attempts produced a new American republic,

along with struggles over the new nation's social, political, and economic identity.

 

 

Day:

18

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic #:

Key Concept: 3.1, GPS: SSUSH3a

 

Our Topic:

Seven Years War

3.1: British attempts to assert tighter control over its North American colonies and the colonial resolve to pursue self-government led to a colonial independence movement and
the Revolutionary War.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 123-128

 

 

Essential Question(s):

MIG-2.0: Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States,
and explain how migration has affected American life.
WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of
cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.
POL-2.0: Explain how popular movements, reform efforts, and activist groups have sought to change American society
and institutions.

 

Material to Master:

I. The competition among the British, French, and American Indians for economic and political advantage in North America culminated in the Seven Years’ War (the French and Indian War), in which Britain defeated France and allied American Indians.
A) Colonial rivalry intensified between Britain and France in the mid-18th century, as the growing population of the British colonies expanded into the interior of North America, threatening French–Indian trade networks and American Indian autonomy.
B) Britain achieved a major expansion of its territorial
holdings by defeating the French, but at tremendous
expense, setting the stage for imperial efforts to raise
revenue and consolidate control over the colonies.
C) After the British victory, imperial officials’ attempts
to prevent colonists from moving westward generated
colonial opposition, while native groups sought to
both continue trading with Europeans and resist
the encroachments of colonists on tribal lands.

II. The desire of many colonists to assert ideals of self-government in the face of renewed British imperial efforts led to a colonial independence movement and war with Britain.
A) The imperial struggles of the mid-18th century, as well as new British efforts to collect taxes without direct colonial
representation or consent and to assert imperial authority in the colonies, began to unite the colonists against perceived and real constraints on their economic
activities and political rights.
B) Colonial leaders based their calls for resistance to Britain
on arguments about the rights of British subjects, the
rights of the individual, local traditions of self-rule, and the
ideas of the Enlightenment.
C) The effort for American independence was energized
by colonial leaders such as Benjamin Franklin, as well as
by popular movements that included the political activism of laborers, artisans, and women.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

Map Lecture -- Overview

Homework:

Boyer: 128-129,132-139

 

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Stamp Act

-Pontiac's Rebellion

-Proclamation of 1763

-Sons of Liberty

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

19

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic #:

Key Concept: 3.1, 3.2 GPS: SSUSH3b

 

Our Topic:

Eve of the Revolution

3.1: British attempts to assert tighter control over its North American colonies and the colonial resolve to pursue self-government led to a colonial independence movement and
the Revolutionary War.

3.2: The American Revolution’s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 128-129,132-139

 

 

Essential Question(s):

WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of
cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.
POL-2.0: Explain how popular movements, reform efforts, and activist groups have sought to change American society
and institutions.

CUL-1.0: Explain how religious groups and ideas have affected American society and political life.

 

Material to Master:

3.1

I. The competition among the British, French, and American Indians for economic and political advantage in North America culminated in the Seven Years’ War (the French and Indian War), in which Britain defeated France and allied American Indians.

C) After the British victory, imperial officials’ attempts
to prevent colonists from moving westward generated
colonial opposition, while native groups sought to
both continue trading with Europeans and resist
the encroachments of colonists on tribal lands.

II. The desire of many colonists to assert ideals of self-government in the face of renewed British imperial efforts led to a colonial independence movement and war with Britain.
A) The imperial struggles of the mid-18th century, as well as new British efforts to collect taxes without direct colonial
representation or consent and to assert imperial authority in the colonies, began to unite the colonists against perceived and real constraints on their economic
activities and political rights.

B) Colonial leaders based their calls for resistance to Britain
on arguments about the rights of British subjects, the
rights of the individual, local traditions of self-rule, and the
ideas of the Enlightenment.
C) The effort for American independence was energized
by colonial leaders such as Benjamin Franklin, as well as
by popular movements that included the political activism of laborers, artisans, and women.

3.2

I. The ideals that inspired the revolutionary cause reflected new beliefs about politics, religion, and society that had been developing over the course of the 18th century.
A) Enlightenment ideas and philosophy inspired many American political thinkers to emphasize individual
talent over hereditary privilege, while religion strengthened Americans’ view of themselves
as a people blessed with liberty.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

Students work complete three paragraphs of a Document Based Question (DBQ)

 

Practice:

-Contextualization

-Thesis

-Extended Analysis of documents

-Additional Historical Example

Homework:

Boyer: 139-149

 

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania

-Daughters of Liberty

-Committees of correspondence

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

20

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic #:

Key Concept: 3.1, GPS: SSUSH3b

 

Our Topic:

Eve of the Revolution

3.1:British attempts to assert tighter control over its North American colonies and the colonial resolve to pursue self-government led to a colonial independence movement and
the Revolutionary War.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 139-149

 

 

Essential Question(s):

WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

 

Material to Master:

I. The competition among the British, French, and American Indians for economic and political advantage in North America culminated in the Seven Years’ War (the French and Indian War), in which Britain defeated France and allied American Indians.
A) Colonial rivalry intensified between Britain and
France in the mid-18th century, as the growing
population of the British  colonies expanded into the
interior of North America, threatening French–Indian
trade networks and American Indian autonomy.

II. The desire of many colonists to assert ideals of self-government in the face of renewed British imperial efforts led to a colonial independence movement and war with Britain.
A) The imperial struggles of the mid-18th century, as well as new British efforts to collect taxes without direct colonial representation or consent and to assert imperial authority in the colonies, began to unite the
colonists against perceived and real constraints on their economic activities and political rights.

Documents to be utilized:

Text of British Acts

 

In Class:

-In groups students read and translate one of the British Parliamentary Acts that aggravated the colonies in the period from 1733 to 1775 and place it on a timeline

 

Translations should include:

-Britain's goal/motivation

-Impact of the colonies, economic and/or political

-Expected colonial response with explanation

 

 -Students explain their act to class while classmates add the information to a timeline

 

Homework:

Boyer: 149-156

 

 

&

Read Abridged Interpretation of Common Sense

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Coercive Acts aka Intolerable Acts

-Common Sense

-Declaration of Independence

-Thomas Jefferson

 

Turn in next class:

Prepare of Socratic Seminar:

Guiding Questions:

1.  Why does Paine stress that revolution will eventually occur? How does he substantiate this claim?

 2.  Why does Paine think it is in America's best interest to be free from Britain? 

3.  How do Paine's opinions about human equality relate to his view of America's relationship with Britain?

4. How important was Common Sense to the movement towards independence?

5. What do you believe is the most important argument Thomas Paine makes in his argument for independence?

 

 

 

 

Day:

21

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic  #:

Key Concept: 3.1, 3.2, GPS: SSUSH3b,c, SSUSH4a

 

Our Topic:

The American Revolutionary Era

3.1:British attempts to assert tighter control over its North American colonies and the colonial resolve to pursue self-government led to a colonial independence movement and
the Revolutionary War.

3.2: The American Revolution’s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 149-156, Common Sense

 

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of
cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.

 

Material to Master:

II. The desire of many colonists to assert ideals of self-government in the face of renewed British imperial efforts led to a colonial independence movement and war with Britain.
B) Colonial leaders based their calls for resistance to Britain on arguments about the rights of British subjects, the rights of the individual, local traditions of self-rule, and the ideas of the Enlightenment.
C) The effort for American independence was energized
by colonial leaders such as Benjamin Franklin, as well as
by popular movements that included the political activism of laborers, artisans, and women.

3.2

I. The ideals that inspired the revolutionary cause reflected new beliefs about politics, religion, and society that had been developing over the course of the 18th century.
A) Enlightenment ideas and philosophy inspired many American political thinkers to emphasize individual
talent over hereditary privilege, while religion strengthened Americans’ view of themselves
as a people blessed with liberty.
B) The colonists’ belief in the superiority of republican forms of government based on the natural rights of the people found expression in Thomas Paine’s Common Sense and the Declaration of Independence. The ideas in these documents resonated throughout American
history, shaping Americans’understanding of the ideals on which the nation was based.

Documents to be utilized:

Common Sense, Thomas Paine

 

In Class:

Socratic Seminar on Common Sense

Guiding Questions:

1.  Why does Paine stress that revolution will eventually occur? How does he substantiate this claim?

 2.  Why does Paine think it is in America's best interest to be free from Britain? 

3.  How do Paine's opinions about human equality relate to his view of America's relationship with Britain?

4. How important was Common Sense to the movement towards independence?

5. What do you believe is the most important argument Thomas Paine makes in his argument for independence?

Homework:

Boyer: A1 to A2

 

 

&

Video

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Declaration of Independence (continued)

 

Turn in next class:

BRING BOOK TO CLASS

 

 

 

Day:

22

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic  #:

Key Concept: 3.2, GPS: SSUSH4a

 

Our Topic:

The Declaration of Independence

3.2: The American Revolution’s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: A1 to A2

 

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of
cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.

 

Material to Master:

I. The ideals that inspired the revolutionary cause reflected new beliefs about politics, religion, and society that had been developing over the course of the 18th century.
B) The colonists’ belief in the superiority of republican forms of government based on the natural rights of the people found expression in Thomas Paine’s Common Sense and the Declaration of Independence. The ideas in these documents resonated throughout American
history, shaping Americans’understanding of the ideals on which the nation was based.

Documents to be utilized:

The Declaration of Independence

 

In Class:

Breakup letter allegory of the Declaration of Independence.

Homework:

Boyer: 159-164

 

 

&

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-George Washington (more to come)

-Delaware River Crossing

-Valley Forge

-Iroquois Confederacy during the revolution

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

23

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic #:

Key Concept: 1.1 to3.2, GPS: SSUSH4b,c

 

Our Topic:

TEST

3.1:British attempts to assert tighter control over its North American colonies and the colonial resolve to pursue self-government led to a colonial independence movement and
the Revolutionary War.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 159-164

 

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of
cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.
POL-2.0: Explain how popular movements, reform efforts, and activist groups have sought to change American society
and institutions.
WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and
peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

 

Material to Master:

TEST

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

Junior TEST

 

 

-PPT on anatomy of revolution with students applying the Crane Model to the American Revolution

 

Homework:

Boyer: 164-167 & 170-174

 

 

&

Video

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Marquis de Lafayette

-Peace of Paris

-Yorktown

-Cornwallis

-French role in the Revolution

-Benjamin Franklin

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

24

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic #:

Key Concept: 3.1, GPS: SSUSH4b,c,d

 

Our Topic:

The American Revolutionary

3.1:British attempts to assert tighter control over its North American colonies and the colonial resolve to pursue self-government led to a colonial independence movement and
the Revolutionary War.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 164-167 & 170-174

 

 

Essential Question(s):

WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and
peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

 

Material to Master:

II. The desire of many colonists to assert ideals of self-government in the face of renewed British imperial efforts led to a colonial independence movement and war with Britain.

D) In the face of economic shortages and the British military occupation of some regions, men and women
mobilized in large numbers to provide financial and material support to the Patriot movement.
E) Despite considerable loyalist opposition, as well as Great Britain’s apparently overwhelming military and financial advantages, the Patriot cause succeeded
because of the actions of colonial militias and the Continental Army, George Washington’s military leadership, the colonists’ ideological commitment and
resilience, and assistance sent by European allies.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

 

Overview lecture continued

Fighting the Revolution to Adams

Homework:

Boyer: 178-192

 

 

&:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Governments of newly formed states

-Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union

-Northwest Ordinance

-Shay's Rebellion

-Virginia Plan

-New Jersey Plan

-Connecticut Compromise

-three-fifths compromise

-Federalists

-Antifederalists

-James Madison (more later)

-Alexander Hamilton (more later)

 

Turn in next class:

bring note cards/outlines/Cornell notes/... to class

 

 

 

Day:

25

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic #:

Key Concept: 3.2, 3.3; GPS: SSUSH5a, SSUSH6a

 

Our Topic:

Articles of Confederation to the Constitution

3.2: The American Revolution’s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government.

3.3: Migration within North America and
competition over resources, boundaries, and trade intensified conflicts among peoples and nations.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 178-192

 

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-2.0: Explain how interpretations of the Constitution and debates over rights, liberties, and definitions
of citizenship have affected American values, politics, and society.
POL-1.0: Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed and changed.
POL-3.0: Explain how different beliefs about the federal government’s role in U.S. social and economic life have affected political debates and policies.
WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.

 

Material to Master:

3.2

I. The ideals that inspired the revolutionary cause reflected new beliefs about politics, religion, and society that had been developing over the course of the 18th century.

C) During and after the American Revolution, an increased
awareness of inequalities in society motivated some
individuals and groups to call for the abolition of slavery and greater political democracy in the new state and national governments.

II. After declaring independence, American political leaders created new constitutions and declarations of rights that articulated the role of the state and federal governments while protecting individual liberties and limiting both centralized power and excessive
popular influence.
A) Many new state constitutions placed power in the hands of the legislative branch and maintained property qualifications for voting and citizenship.
B) The Articles of Confederation unified the newly independent states, creating a central government with
limited power. After the Revolution, difficulties over international trade, finances, interstate commerce, foreign relations, and internal unrest led to calls for a stronger central government.
C) Delegates from the states participated in a Constitutional Convention and through negotiation,
collaboration, and compromise proposed a constitution that created a limited but dynamic central government embodying federalism and providing for a separation of
powers between its three branches.
D) The Constitutional Convention compromised over the representation of slave states in Congress and the
role of the federal government in regulating both slavery and the slave trade, allowing the prohibition of the
international slave trade after 1808.
E) In the debate over ratifying the Constitution, Anti-Federalists opposing ratification battled with
Federalists, whose principles were articulated in the Federalist Papers (primarily written by Alexander
Hamilton and James Madison).  Federalists ensured the ratification of the Constitution by promising the addition of a Bill of Rights that enumerated individual rights and
explicitly restricted the powers of the federal government.

3.3

I. In the decades after American independence, interactions among different groups resulted in competition for resources, shifting alliances, and cultural blending.

C) As settlers moved westward during the 1780s, Congress
enacted the Northwest Ordinance for admitting new states; the ordinance promoted public education, the protection of private property, and a ban on slavery in the Northwest Territory.

Documents to be utilized:

- "Brutus" Letter XVI April 10, 1788, "John DeWitt" Letter III Nov. 5, 1787, Anti-federalists Papers

-Federalist Papers #38, James Madison, published on January 12, 1788 under the pseudonym Publius

-Federalist Papers #30, Alexander Hamilton, published on December 28, 1787 under the pseudonym Publius

 

 

In Class:

Problems with Articles of Confederations / Challenges with ratification DBQ

Homework:

Video

 

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

 

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

26

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic  #:

Key Concept: 3.2; GPS: SSUSH5a, b, c, d

 

Our Topic:

Articles of Confederation to the Constitution

3.2: The American Revolution’s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government.

3.3: Migration within North America and
competition over resources, boundaries, and trade intensified conflicts among peoples and nations.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 185-189

 

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-2.0: Explain how interpretations of the Constitution and debates over rights, liberties, and definitions
of citizenship have affected American values, politics, and society.
POL-1.0: Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed and changed.
POL-3.0: Explain how different beliefs about the federal government’s role in U.S. social and economic life have affected political debates and policies.
WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.

 

Material to Master:

3.2

I. The ideals that inspired the revolutionary cause reflected new beliefs about politics, religion, and society that had been developing over the course of the 18th century.

C) During and after the American Revolution, an increased
awareness of inequalities in society motivated some
individuals and groups to call for the abolition of slavery and greater political democracy in the new state and national governments.

II. After declaring independence, American political leaders created new constitutions and declarations of rights that articulated the role of the state and federal governments while protecting individual liberties and limiting both centralized power and excessive
popular influence.
A) Many new state constitutions placed power in the hands of the legislative branch and maintained property qualifications for voting and citizenship.
B) The Articles of Confederation unified the newly independent states, creating a central government with
limited power. After the Revolution, difficulties over international trade, finances, interstate commerce, foreign relations, and internal unrest led to calls for a stronger central government.
C) Delegates from the states participated in a Constitutional Convention and through negotiation,
collaboration, and compromise proposed a constitution that created a limited but dynamic central government embodying federalism and providing for a separation of
powers between its three branches.
D) The Constitutional Convention compromised over the representation of slave states in Congress and the
role of the federal government in regulating both slavery and the slave trade, allowing the prohibition of the
international slave trade after 1808.
E) In the debate over ratifying the Constitution, Anti-Federalists opposing ratification battled with
Federalists, whose principles were articulated in the Federalist Papers (primarily written by Alexander
Hamilton and James Madison).  Federalists ensured the ratification of the Constitution by promising the addition of a Bill of Rights that enumerated individual rights and
explicitly restricted the powers of the federal government.

3.3

I. In the decades after American independence, interactions among different groups resulted in competition for resources, shifting alliances, and cultural blending.

C) As settlers moved westward during the 1780s, Congress
enacted the Northwest Ordinance for admitting new states; the ordinance promoted public education, the protection of private property, and a ban on slavery in the Northwest Territory.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

Problems with Articles of Confederations / Challenges with ratification DBQ

 

Homework:

Complete this with this

 

 

&

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

 

 

Turn in next class:

Count the words in Constitution USE a word processor!

Bring book to class

 

 

 

Day:

27

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic  #:

Key Concept: 3.2; GPS: SSUSH5a, b, c, d stopped

 

Our Topic:

Articles of Confederation to the Constitution

3.2: The American Revolution’s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 189-192

 

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-2.0: Explain how interpretations of the Constitution and debates over rights, liberties, and definitions
of citizenship have affected American values, politics, and society.
POL-1.0: Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed and changed.
POL-3.0: Explain how different beliefs about the federal government’s role in U.S. social and economic life have affected political debates and policies.
WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.

 

Material to Master:

3.2

I. The ideals that inspired the revolutionary cause reflected new beliefs about politics, religion, and society that had been developing over the course of the 18th century.

C) During and after the American Revolution, an increased
awareness of inequalities in society motivated some
individuals and groups to call for the abolition of slavery and greater political democracy in the new state and national governments.

II. After declaring independence, American political leaders created new constitutions and declarations of rights that articulated the role of the state and federal governments while protecting individual liberties and limiting both centralized power and excessive
popular influence.
A) Many new state constitutions placed power in the hands of the legislative branch and maintained property qualifications for voting and citizenship.
B) The Articles of Confederation unified the newly independent states, creating a central government with
limited power. After the Revolution, difficulties over international trade, finances, interstate commerce, foreign relations, and internal unrest led to calls for a stronger central government.
C) Delegates from the states participated in a Constitutional Convention and through negotiation,
collaboration, and compromise proposed a constitution that created a limited but dynamic central government embodying federalism and providing for a separation of
powers between its three branches.
D) The Constitutional Convention compromised over the representation of slave states in Congress and the
role of the federal government in regulating both slavery and the slave trade, allowing the prohibition of the
international slave trade after 1808.
E) In the debate over ratifying the Constitution, Anti-Federalists opposing ratification battled with
Federalists, whose principles were articulated in the Federalist Papers (primarily written by Alexander
Hamilton and James Madison).  Federalists ensured the ratification of the Constitution by promising the addition of a Bill of Rights that enumerated individual rights and
explicitly restricted the powers of the federal government.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

- students complete the mapping the Constitutions worksheet and students link quotes to Federalist / Antifederalist debate

 

Homework:

Boyer: A-3 to A-12

 

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

 

 

Turn in next class:

Comparison Table of Articles of Confederation and Constitution

Bring book to class

 

 

 

Day:

28

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic #:

Key Concept: 3.2; GPS: SSUSH5a, b, c, d

 

Our Topic:

The Constitution

3.2: The American Revolution’s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: A-3 to A-12

 

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-2.0: Explain how interpretations of the Constitution and debates over rights, liberties, and definitions
of citizenship have affected American values, politics, and society.
POL-1.0: Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed and changed.
POL-3.0: Explain how different beliefs about the federal government’s role in U.S. social and economic life have affected political debates and policies.

 

Material to Master:

II. After declaring independence, American political leaders created new constitutions and declarations of rights that articulated the role of the state and federal governments while protecting individual liberties and limiting both centralized power and excessive
popular influence.
C) Delegates from the states participated in a Constitutional Convention and through negotiation,
collaboration, and compromise proposed a constitution that created a limited but dynamic central government embodying federalism and providing for a separation of
powers between its three branches.
D) The Constitutional Convention compromised over the representation of slave states in Congress and the
role of the federal government in regulating both slavery and the slave trade, allowing the prohibition of the
international slave trade after 1808.

Documents to be utilized:

The United States Constitution

The Articles of Confederation

 

In Class:

Turn in table

 

-Students outline 6 Big ideas of the Constitution on table

Homework:

Zinn: 77-89 (Chapter 5, A Kind of Revolution)

 

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

 

 

Turn in next class:

Prepare for Socratic Seminar on day 30

 

 

 

Day:

29

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic #:

Key Concepts 3.1 to 3.3

 

Our Topic:

Review

3.2: The American Revolution’s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government.

Required

Pre-Reading:

 

 

 

Essential Question(s):

CUL-2.0: Explain how artistic, philosophical, and scientific ideas have developed and shaped society and institutions.

 

Material to Master:

III. New forms of national culture and political institutions developed in the United States alongside continued regional variations and differences over economic, political, social, and foreign policy issues.

D) Ideas about national identity increasingly found expression in works of art, literature, and architecture.

Documents to be utilized:

A People's History of the United States 1492-Present, by Howard Zinn, chapter 5

 

In Class:

Review in Pictures

-recap with political cartoons

Homework:

Zinn: 89-102 (Chapter 5, A Kind of Revolution)

 

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Pennsylvania Gradual Emancipation Law

- Battle of Fallen Timbers

 

Turn in next class:

Prepare for Socratic Seminar

Guiding Questions:

1.      How did the demographics and structure of the American militia change as the war went on?

2.      “Everywhere one finds inequality... the revolution did nothing to end and little to ameliorate white bondage.”  (pg 84) Evaluate this statement.

3.      According to Zinn, what effect did the Revolutionary War have on Blacks, Native Americans, and poor Whites?

4.      “The class structure did not change radically (after the Revolution) (pg 84). Evaluate this statement

5.      Was the Constitution & Revolution a force for equality and freedom or tyranny and economic oppression?

 

 

 

Day:

30

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic  #:

Key Concept: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3

 

Our Topic:

Social Class and the American Revolution

3.1: British attempts to assert tighter control over its North American colonies and the colonial resolve to pursue self-government led to a colonial independence movement and the Revolutionary War.

3.2: The American Revolution’s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government.

3.3: Migration within North America and
competition over resources, boundaries, and trade intensified conflicts among peoples and nations.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Zinn: 89-102 (Chapter 5, A Kind of Revolution)

 

 

Essential Question(s):

CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged
and changed over time.

NAT-1.0: Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of
cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.

 

Material to Master:

3.1

II. The desire of many colonists to assert ideals of self-government in the face of renewed
British imperial efforts led to a colonial independence movement and war with Britain.

C) The effort for American independence was energized
by colonial leaders such as Benjamin Franklin, as well as
by popular movements that included the political activism of laborers, artisans, and women.

3.2

I. The ideals that inspired the revolutionary cause reflected new beliefs about politics, religion, and society that had been developing over the course of the 18th century.

C) During and after the American Revolution, an increased awareness of inequalities in society motivated some individuals and groups to call for the abolition of slavery and greater political democracy in the new
state and national governments.

II. After declaring independence, American political leaders created new constitutions and declarations of rights that articulated the role of the state and federal governments while protecting individual liberties and limiting both centralized power and excessive
popular influence.

D) The Constitutional Convention compromised over the representation of slave states in Congress and the
role of the federal government in regulating both slavery and the slave trade, allowing the prohibition of the
international slave trade after 1808.

III. New forms of national culture and political institutions developed in the United States alongside continued regional variations and differences over
economic, political, social, and foreign policy issues.

C) The expansion of slavery in the deep South and
adjacent western lands and rising antislavery sentiment
began to create distinctive regional attitudes
toward the institution.

3.3

I. In the decades after American independence, interactions among different groups resulted in competition for resources, shifting alliances, and cultural blending.
A) Various American Indian groups repeatedly evaluated
and adjusted their alliances with Europeans, other tribes,
and the U.S., seeking to limit migration of white settlers
and maintain control of tribal lands and natural resources.
British alliances with American Indians contributed to tensions between the U.S. and Britain.

D) An ambiguous relationship between the federal government and American Indian tribes contributed to problems regarding treaties and American Indian legal claims relating to the seizure of their lands.

Documents to be utilized:

A People's History of the United States 1492-Present, by Howard Zinn, chapter 5

 

In Class:

Socratic Seminar

Guiding Questions:

1.      How did the demographics and structure of the American militia change as the war went on?

2.      “Everywhere one finds inequality... the revolution did nothing to end and little to ameliorate white bondage.”  (pg 84) Evaluate this statement.

3.      According to Zinn, what effect did the Revolutionary War have on Blacks, Native Americans, and poor Whites?

4.      “The class structure did not change radically (after the Revolution) (pg 84). Evaluate this statement

5.      Was the Constitution & Revolution a force for equality and freedom or tyranny and economic oppression?

 

Homework:

Schweikart: 190-193, 120-124

 

 

&

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

- Alexander Hamilton (cont)

 

Turn in next class:

Prepare for Socratic Seminar

Guiding Questions:

1.      What does Scheikart mean by the term Economic Determinism?

2.      Schweikart argues that the American Revolutionaries were not economically motivated, how well does he support this claim?

3.     What is factionalism and how do the authors use it to support political idealism of the founders?

4.     Do Hamilton's arguments and actions support Zinn or Schwikart's arguement?

5.     Was the Constitution & Revolution a force for equality and freedom or tyranny and economic oppression?

 

 

 

Day:

31

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic  #:

Key Concept: 3.2

 

Our Topic:

Formation of Political Parties

3.2: The American Revolution’s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Schweikart: 190-193, 120-124

 

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-2.0: Explain how interpretations of the Constitution and debates over rights, liberties, and definitions of citizenship have affected American values, politics, and society.
POL-1.0: Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed
and changed.

 

Material to Master:

3.2

I. The ideals that inspired the revolutionary cause reflected new beliefs about politics, religion, and society that had been developing over the course of the 18th century.

C) During and after the American Revolution, an increased awareness of inequalities in society motivated some individuals and groups to call for the abolition of slavery and greater political democracy in the new
state and national governments.

III. New forms of national culture and political institutions developed in the United States alongside continued regional variations and differences over economic, political, social, and foreign policy issues.

B) Political leaders in the 1790s took a variety of
positions on issues such as the relationship between
the national government and the states, economic
policy, foreign policy, and the balance between
liberty and order. This led to the formation of political
parties — most significantly the Federalists, led by
Alexander Hamilton, and the Democratic-Republican Party, led by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison.

Documents to be utilized:

48 Liberal Lies About American History (That You Probably Learned in School) by Larry Schweikart, Lie #38

A Patriot's History of the United States From Columbus's Great Discovery to the War on Terror by Larry Schweikart and Michael Allen

 

In Class:

Socratic Seminar

Guiding Questions:

1.      What does Scheikart mean by the term Economic Determinism?

2.      Schweikart argues that the American Revolutionaries were not economically motivated, how well does he support this claim?

3.     What is factionalism and how do the authors use it to support political idealism of the founders?

4.     Do Hamilton's arguments and actions support Zinn or Schwikart's arguement?

5.     Was the Constitution & Revolution a force for equality and freedom or tyranny and economic oppression?

 

Homework:

Boyer: 195-203

 

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-The Washington Presidency

-Bill of Rights

-Hamilton's Financial Plans

-Federalist

-Hamilton vs. Jefferson

-Whiskey Rebellion

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

32

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic #:

Key Concept: 3.2, 3.3; GPS: SSUSH5d, e

 

Our Topic:

Washington Presidency, Domestic

3.2: In the late 18th century, new experiments with democratic ideas and republican forms of government, as well as other new religious,
economic, and cultural ideas, challenged traditional imperial systems across the Atlantic World.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 195-203

 

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-2.0: Explain how interpretations of the Constitution and debates over rights, liberties, and definitions of citizenship have affected American values, politics, and society.
POL-1.0: Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed and changed.
POL-3.0: Explain how different beliefs about the federal government’s role in U.S. social and economic life have affected political debates and policies.

 

Material to Master:

III. New forms of national culture and political institutions developed in the United States alongside continued regional variations and differences over economic, political, social, and foreign policy issues.
A) During the presidential administrations of George
Washington and John Adams, political leaders created institutions and precedents that put the principles of the
Constitution into practice.
B) Political leaders in the 1790s took a variety of positions on issues such as the relationship between the national government and the states, economic policy, foreign policy, and the balance between liberty and order. This led
to the formation of political parties — most significantly
the Federalists, led by Alexander Hamilton, and the
Democratic-Republican Party, led by Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison.

I. In the decades after American independence, interactions among different groups resulted in competition for resources, shifting alliances, and cultural blending.

B) As increasing numbers of migrants from North America
and other parts of the world continued to move westward,
frontier cultures that had emerged in the colonial period
continued to grow, fueling social, political, and ethnic tensions.

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

 

-Quick lecture on Washington Presidency

 

-Applying the Bill or Rights

Homework:

Boyer: 203-210  

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-New California

-Indian Non-Intercourse Act (1790)

-America and the French Revolution

-Pinckney Treaty

-Jay Treaty

-George Washington's Farewell Address

-Yazoo Land Tract

-Proclamation of American Neutrality

-Haitian Revolution

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

33

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic#:

Key Concept: 3.2, 3.3; GPS: SSUH5e

 

Our Topic:

Washington Presidency, International

3.2: The American Revolution’s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government.

3.3: Migration within North America and
competition over resources, boundaries, and trade intensified conflicts among peoples and nations.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 203-210

 

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-3.0: Analyze how ideas about national identity changed in response to U.S. involvement in international conflicts
and the growth of the United States.
POL-1.0: Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed and changed.
WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.
WOR-2.0: Analyze the reasons for, and results of, U.S. diplomatic, economic, and military initiatives in North America
and overseas.

 

Material to Master:

3.2

I. The ideals that inspired the revolutionary cause reflected new beliefs about politics,
religion, and society that had been developing over the course of the 18th century.

E) The American Revolution
and the ideals set forth in the
Declaration of Independence
reverberated in France, Haiti, and
Latin America, inspiring future
independence movements.

3.3

I. In the decades after American independence, interactions among different groups resulted in competition for resources, shifting alliances, and cultural blending.

B) As increasing numbers of migrants from North America and other parts of the world continued to move westward, frontier cultures that had
emerged in the colonial period continued to grow, fueling social, political, and ethnic tensions.

E) The Spanish, supported by the bonded labor of the local American Indians, expanded their mission settlements into California; these provided opportunities for social mobility among soldiers and led to new cultural blending.

II. The continued presence of European powers in North America challenged the United States to find ways to safeguard its borders, maintain neutral trading
rights, and promote its economic interests.
A) The United States government forged diplomatic initiatives aimed at dealing with the continued British
and Spanish presence in North America, as U.S.
settlers migrated beyond the Appalachians and
sought free navigation of the Mississippi River.
B) War between France and Britain resulting from
the French Revolution presented challenges to
the United States over issues of free trade and
foreign policy and fostered political disagreement.
C) George Washington’s Farewell Address
encouraged national unity, as he cautioned
against political factions and warned about the
danger of permanent foreign alliances. 

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

Quick Lecture on Adams Presidency

 

-Students evaluate Political Cartoons and attempt to guess what the original caption was

 

 

Homework:

Boyer: 210-216

 

 

Optional:

Video

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Federalist Party

-Republican Party

-Election of 1800

 

Turn in next class:

Complete wrap up from today Comparison Chart

 

Prepare for tomorrow:

 

Prepare for your role in simulation, your seat number indicates your role, be prepared to discuss how your person would respond to each of the following: Nullification, XYZ Affair, Alien and Sedition Acts, Impressment, French Revolution, Jay Treaty, Slavery, Kentucky Resolution, God and Religious President, High Federalists, Western Expansion, Irish Immigration, French Immigration, Pinkney Treaty, Quasi-War, Fries Rebellion, Virginia Resolution, National Debt, 33% taxes, trade with Britain, trade with France

 

1.George Washington, 2.John Jay, 3.Alexander Hamilton, 4.Citizen Genet, 5.James Madison, 6.Aaron Burr, 7.French refugee from Saint Domingue, 8.America sailor, 9.America merchant ship captain, 10.western Pennsylvania farmer, 11.Boston merchant, 12.New York laborer, 13.southern plantation owner, 14.Virginia farmer, 15.Senator from Massachusetts, 16.Senator from New Hampshire, 17.Senator from Vermont, 18.Senator from Rhode Island, 19.Senator from Connecticut, 20.Senator from New York, 21.Senator from Pennsylvania, 22.Senator from  New Jersey, 23.Senator from  Delaware, 24.Senator from Maryland, 25.Senator from Virginia, 26.Senator from  Kentucky, 27.Senator from North Carolina, 28.Senator from Tennessee, 29.Senator from South Carolina, 30.Senator from Georgia, 31.resident of the Northwest Territory, 32.resident of Indiana Territory 33. plantation owner from South Carolina

 

Prepare a written position statement based on the directions on this sheet and thoroughly prepare to act as your assigned roles related to the election of 1800, acting in this roles you will debate the merits and weaknesses of candidates for president: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.  Your score will be based on the following: 

-frequency of participation: 20pts each

-accuracy of role: 20pts

-integration of the topics listed above into discussion: 50 pts each

-written contributions -- see rubric

 

 

 

Day:

34m

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic #:

Key Concept: 3.2, 3.3, 4.1; SSUSH5e

 

Our Topic:

Election of 1800

3.2: The American Revolution’s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government.

3.3: Migration within North America, cooperative interaction, and competition for resources raised questions about boundaries and policies, intensified conflicts among peoples and nations, and led to contests over the creation of a multiethnic, multiracial national identity.

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nation’s democratic ideals and change their society and institutions to match them.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 210-216

 

 

Essential Question(s):

WOR-1.0: Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

NAT-2.0: Explain how interpretations of the Constitution and debates over rights, liberties, and definitions of citizenship have affected American values, politics, and society.
NAT-4.0: Analyze relationships among different regional, social, ethnic, and racial groups, and explain how these groups’ experiences have related to U.S. national identity.

WXT-2.0: Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.

 

Material to Master:

3.3

II. The continued presence of European powers in North America challenged the United States to find ways to safeguard its borders, maintain neutral trading rights, and promote its economic interests.

B) War between France and Britain resulting from the French Revolution presented challenges to the United States over issues of free trade and foreign policy and fostered political disagreement.

4.1

I. The nation’s transition to a more participatory democracy was achieved by expanding suffrage from a system based on property ownership to one based
on voting by all adult white men, and it was accompanied by the growth of political parties.
A) In the early 1800s, national political parties continued
to debate issues such as the tariff, powers of the federal
government, and relations with European powers.

D) Regional interests often trumped national concerns
as the basis for many political leaders’ positions on
slavery and economic policy.

Documents to be utilized:

48 Liberal Lies About American History (That You Probably Learned in School) by Larry Scheikart, Lie #14 Women Had No Rights in Early America

 

In Class:

Simulation: Election of 1800

 

Students are assigned roles related to the election of 1800, acting in these roles they debate the merits and weaknesses of candidates for president: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.

 

Students complete second part of this as they debate

 

Rubric

 

Roles: 1.George Washington, 2.John Jay, 3.Alexander Hamilton, 4.Citizen Genet, 5.James Madison, 6.Aaron Burr, 7.French refugee from Saint Domingue, 8.America sailor, 9.America merchant ship captain, 10.western Pennsylvania farmer, 11.Boston merchant, 12.New York laborer, 13.southern plantation owner, 14.Virginia farmer, 15.Senator from Massachusetts, 16.Senator from New Hampshire, 17.Senator from Vermont, 18.Senator from Rhode Island, 19.Senator from Connecticut, 20.Senator from New York, 21.Senator from Pennsylvania, 22.Senator from  New Jersey, 23.Senator from  Delaware, 24.Senator from Maryland, 25.Senator from Virginia, 26.Senator from  Kentucky, 27.Senator from North Carolina, 28.Senator from Tennessee, 29.Senator from South Carolina, 30.Senator from Georgia, 31.resident of the Northwest Territory, 32.resident of Indiana Territory

33. plantation owner from South Carolina

 

 

Homework:

Boyer: 216-217, 221-224

 

 

&:

Schweikart: 78-82

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-Fugitive Slave Law (more added later)

-Cotton Gin

-Republican Motherhood

-Abigail Adams

-John Adams

 

 

 

Day:

35t

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic #:

Key Concept: 3.2, 4.1; SSUSH5e

 

Our Topic:

Adams Presidency, Society

3.2: In the late 18th century, new experiments with democratic ideas and republican forms of government, as well as other new religious,
economic, and cultural ideas, challenged traditional imperial systems across the Atlantic World.

4.1: The United States began to develop a modern
democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nation’s democratic ideals and change their society and institutions to match them.

Required

Pre-Reading:

Boyer: 216-217, 221-224

Schweikart: 78-82

 

 

Essential Question(s):

NAT-4.0: Analyze relationships among different regional, social, ethnic, and racial groups, and explain how these groups’ experiences have related to U.S. national identity.

CUL-4.0: Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and
changed over time.

WXT-1.0: Explain how different labor systems developed in North America and the United States, and explain their effects
on workers’ lives and U.S. society.

CUL-3.0: Explain how ideas about women’s rights and gender roles have affected society and politics.

 

Material to Master:

3.2

I. The ideals that inspired the revolutionary cause reflected new beliefs about politics, religion, and society that had been developing over the course of the 18th century.

D) In response to women’s participation in the American
Revolution, Enlightenment ideas, and women’s appeals
for expanded roles, an ideal of “republican motherhood”
gained popularity. It called on women to teach republican values within the family and granted women a new importance in American political culture.
E) The American Revolution and the ideals set forth in the
Declaration of Independence reverberated in France, Haiti, and Latin America, inspiring future independence movements.

III. New forms of national culture and political institutions developed in the United States alongside continued regional variations and differences over economic, political, social, and foreign policy issues.

C) The expansion of slavery in the deep South and
adjacent western lands and rising antislavery sentiment
began to create distinctive regional attitudes
toward the institution.

4.1

II. While Americans embraced a new national culture, various groups developed distinctive cultures of their own.
A) The rise of democratic and individualistic beliefs, a
response to rationalism, and changes to society caused
by the market revolution, along with greater social
and geographical mobility, contributed to a Second
Great Awakening among Protestants that influenced
moral and social reforms and inspired utopian and
other religious movements.

Documents to be utilized:

48 Liberal Lies About American History (That You Probably Learned in School) by Larry Scheikart, Lie #14 Women Had No Rights in Early America

Global impact of the Haitian Revolution

 

In Class:

Students read and syntheses three sources on the social and economic events of the period from 1789-1800 to identify the causal and consequential links.  Students organize this data with a partner into a graphic organizer that demonstrates their understanding of the thematic, causal, and consequential connections in the events described in the material to master.

 

DIRECTIONS

1.     Individually, silently read and annotate the document(s).

2.     With your previously assigned partner, decide on a graphic organizer which will best organize the information. You need an overall thematic idea to tie together Market Economy, Republican Motherhood (women’s rights), and growth of slavery and free Black communities, the rest is up to you.

3.     You will have to identify 3 causal and consequential links.

4.     You need AT LEAST 5 facts for each of the 3 topics.

5.     Together with your partner, complete 1 Graphic Organizer.

6.     Once the Graphic Organizer is complete, INDIVIDUALLY summarize your information in a paragraph of AT LEAST 5 sentences.

7.     At the bell, turn in 1 Graphic Organizer per group, and every individual student should turn in their summary.

 

Homework:

STUDY!!!

 

 

&:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

 

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

36w

Dates:

1754-1800

Topic #:

5 & 6

 

Our Topic:

Review

Required

Pre-Reading:

   

 

Essential Question(s):

How should I study for this test!

 

Material to Master:

 

Documents to be utilized:

 

 

In Class:

Go over Junior Test

Study Guide

Homework:

STUDY

 

 

Optional:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

 

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

Day:

37t

Dates:

to 1800

Topic #:

1-4

 

In Class:

 

 

TEST

Homework:

Video  

 

&/or:

 

 

&

 

 

Flashcards &/or outlines:

-The Jefferson Presidency

-Louisiana Purchase

-Lewis and Clark

-Federalists

-Democratic-Republicans

 

Turn in next class:

 

 

 

 

 

What are other AP U.S. Teachers doing?

 

www.historyteacher.net    

 

How we do this:

 

THIS IS HOW TO WRITE A DBQ!!!!!!!!

Paragraph 1

Context

4 to 5 Sentences:

Contextualization (explain what happened 10 to 20 years prior that caused this
In the years leading up to…. OR In the early/late ___ century…

 

 

Thesis

Sentence 3: Your position on each part of the question; basically a one sentence answer to the question. (your claim)

 

Sentence 4: Your plan for answering each part of the question; basically list what you are going to say about each part of the question (your data)

 

 

Paragraph 2

Claim

Sentence 1: Topic Sentence: restate the first thing you listed in paragraph 1, sentence 4 (your claim)

 

Data

Sentence 2:  Prove THIS claim only with data from a document.

 

Warrant

Sentence 3: warrant this data by explaining extended analysis on this document (refer to your purple sheet):
POV OR Intended Audience OR Historical Context OR Intended purpose

 

Data

Sentence 4:  Prove THIS claim only with data from a document.

 

Warrant

Sentence 5: warrant this data by explaining extended analysis on this document (refer to your purple sheet):
POV OR Intended Audience OR Historical Context OR Intended purpose

 

 

Sentence 7-?: repeat as necessary, STAY ON TOPIC

 

Claim

Last Sentence: Explain how your data supports your claim

 

 

 

Paragraph 3

Claim

Sentence 1: Topic Sentence: restate the second thing you listed in paragraph 1, sentence 4 (your claim)

 

Sentence 2:  Prove THIS claim only with data from a document.

 

Data

Sentence 3: warrant this data by explaining extended analysis on this document (refer to your purple sheet):
POV OR Intended Audience OR Historical Context OR Intended purpose

 

Warrant

Sentence 4:  Prove THIS claim only with data from a document.

 

Data

Sentence 5: warrant this data by explaining extended analysis on this document (refer to your purple sheet):
POV OR Intended Audience OR Historical Context OR Intended purpose

 

Warrant

Sentence 2:  Prove THIS claim only with data from a document.

 

 

Sentence 7-?: repeat as necessary, STAY ON TOPIC

 

Claim

Last Sentence: Explain how your data supports your claim

 

Repeat as necessary ­

Paragraph 4

Claim

Sentence 1: Topic Sentence: restate a part of your thesis that you listed in paragraph 1, sentence 4 (your claim)

 

Data

Sentence 2:  Prove THIS claim only with data NOT found in a document -- USE outside information

 

Warrant

Sentence 3: warrant this data by explaining how and why it proves the claim

 

Data

Sentence 4:  Prove THIS claim only with data NOT found in a document -- USE outside information

 

Warrant

Sentence 5: warrant this data by explaining how and why it proves the claim

 

 

Sentence 6-?: repeat as necessary, STAY ON TOPIC

 

Claim

Last Sentence: Explain how your data supports your claim

 

 

 

Paragraph 5

Thesis

Sentence 1: Your position on each part of the question; basically a one sentence answer to the question. (your claim)

 

Sentence 2: Your plan for answering each part of the question; basically list what you said about each part of the question (your data)

 

Synthesis

Sentences 3: Identify an event, person, era… from at least 20 years before or after this topic that is similar to this topic

 

Sentences 4-5: Explain how it is similar

 

Sentence 6-7: Explain how this bolsters the significance of your thesis by proving that this is part of a larger pattern in American History

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fellow US History Teachers are welcome to use any material found on this site for non-commercial personal and classroom use, if you have any questions you can contact Chad Hoge here.